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I posted recently about moving to Colorado at the beginning of April and I'm now considering moving 2-3 purchased nucs from GA to CO in a cargo carrier on the back of the suv. I have contacted the Dept of Ag in Ga and will have them inspected before the move so this is legal. I'm more concerned and wanted opinions on the best way to keep them alive on a 20 hour overnight haul. Nucs are a lot cheaper in the southeast and it seems I'll be able to get about 4 weeks head start from when I could get my hands on some in Colorado as I'm behind the curve ordering them.

My current plan of attack is to put them in 8 frame hives w/ screened bottom boards and strap them into the cargo carrier facing directly backward/forward so the frames don't slap during acceleration/braking. I would also cage the queens in each individual hive. I've read about people screening the top of the hive also so there is more airflow and no cover, that may be a good idea. I would then cover with a tarp or blanket to try to prevent them getting too hot. I think the weather should be relatively mild April 5 but it's always a guess that time of year. My last concern is exhaust fumes. Getting caught in heavy traffic could do them in... Any ideas or suggestions?

My friend selling me the nucs is most concerned about the bees making it and that is my priority also.
 

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I moved from Courtland Virginia the end November 2018 to Gould Oklahoma with 3 hives. I had screened bb and strapped the boxes together, 8 frame medium equipment with no problems. just close the entrance with screen wire. I would make sure they have enough store for the trip. The queen was free to do as she wished. Sounds like the bees will be in the boxes a short time before moving them. If this is the case I would recommend that you put a nail or stick pin next to both end frames so they wont move side to side. My boxes had the frames propolise by the bee before moving. As long as you are not stock in a massive traffic jam the bees should be fine with the exhaust.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. It looks comparable, about a 20 hour drive for you too. Did you stay overnight somewhere or drive overnight and do the 20hrs at once?
 

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I was thinking about moving hives, and the easiest way I could think of to keep frames from moving was to wedge them to one side with door stops. I am not sure how well this would work, but I think it would.

As for the weather, April 5th is still iffy, you may have 60's when you get here or you may be driving thru a blizzard. Last year our last frost was the week after mothers day, but mothers day is usually considered the last frost.

I am not sure I would want both a top and a bottom screen. I suspect you would have to much air flow and may freeze the bees. It may be worth looking at how hives are transported commercially. I dont think the trucks stop long but I think they have solid tops and bottoms on their hives.
 

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I know a fellow that moves packages all over the country. He moves them in a covered trailer. They all have screened sides so they don't overheat. The biggest problem he has is high temperatures in the trailer. He has screened openings and fans to exhaust the heat. The first year he started he didn't have fans and lost most of a load on a sunny day. I think most of the time he drives in May but I haven't talked to him for 4 or 5 years.

I think the nails next to the frames sounds good for a hive with frames.

Best of luck to you.
 

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I posted recently about moving to Colorado at the beginning of April and I'm now considering moving 2-3 purchased nucs from GA to CO in a cargo carrier on the back of the suv. I have contacted the Dept of Ag in Ga and will have them inspected before the move so this is legal. I'm more concerned and wanted opinions on the best way to keep them alive on a 20 hour overnight haul. Nucs are a lot cheaper in the southeast and it seems I'll be able to get about 4 weeks head start from when I could get my hands on some in Colorado as I'm behind the curve ordering them.

My current plan of attack is to put them in 8 frame hives w/ screened bottom boards and strap them into the cargo carrier facing directly backward/forward so the frames don't slap during acceleration/braking. I would also cage the queens in each individual hive. I've read about people screening the top of the hive also so there is more airflow and no cover, that may be a good idea. I would then cover with a tarp or blanket to try to prevent them getting too hot. I think the weather should be relatively mild April 5 but it's always a guess that time of year. My last concern is exhaust fumes. Getting caught in heavy traffic could do them in... Any ideas or suggestions?

My friend selling me the nucs is most concerned about the bees making it and that is my priority also.
We moved from NC to MT a couple of years back and I had the same dilemma. I made the choice to just sell them and buy new bees here in MT. One of my (few) best beekeeping decisions ever. Made the trip a lot more fun and I didnt have to worry about bees and could actually enjoy the experience. Also, consider that bees in GA may not do as well in CO. My fear was hauling bees across the country and then them dying on the trip or during the winter. April should be a fine time to buy some Nucs in that area. The spring build up (here at least) is something I wasnt expecting. THey may start later than they did down south but MAN when they get going they really get going!
 

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Took about 3 days to do the move. The bees did fine. They traveled in the bed of the pickup that was on a trailer behind a U-Haul large mover. They survived the winter and was able to grow the apiary from swarms.
 

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Thanks for all the replies here. I still can't make up my mind on what to do. I have two swarm traps out and hoping to catch a few swarms before April 5. I think that would make the decision easier for me, at least less financial risk.
 
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