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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently accepted a job that will have me moving from Atlanta, GA to either the San Francisco area or Seattle area. I am trying to decide if I can take my 3 hives with me or if will need to rehome them. It looks like I will he leaving sometime in December or early January. I am worried that they won’t survive the drive because

1. The duration of the trip. I am assuming it will take 3-4 days to make the drive.
2. They would like be outside during the drive and I am thinking as I get north (Towards Seattle if I end up there) they could freeze along the way.

Does anyone have any experience with this. Thanks for your thought.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Perfect time to get new equipment and bees better suited to the cooler temps.
 

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I don't see that moving them would be a problem, on or in a truck, not a small trailer, too much bouncing. Screened top and bottom board protected from the wind. Pollinators move thousands, millions, of hives across the county all the time just netted and leaving the entrance open. Now the work and hassle involved might make it cost ineffective.
"bees better suited to the cooler temps.", I wouldn't worry about that.
 

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I don't see that moving them would be a problem, on or in a truck, not a small trailer, too much bouncing. Screened top and bottom board protected from the wind. Pollinators move thousands, millions, of hives across the county all the time just netted and leaving the entrance open. Now the work and hassle involved might make it cost ineffective.
"bees better suited to the cooler temps.", I wouldn't worry about that.
Never seen any bees being moved in December or January, though. Maybe they do but I have never known of it. Think with just 3 hives I would not fool with moving them and just start over once you are settled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the thoughts. I am starting to lean that way. Sucks because I just started over again 2 years ago and these are just getting into their prime. I am concerned that they would struggle during transport as it will be quite cold up in Seattle by the time I get there assuming that is the final destination.
 

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I moved at the end of November into December last year. Moved from Courtland Va. to Gould Ok. I took three hives with me, screened off the opening and strapped the boxes together. The one problem I had was the boxes shifting the first day and some bee got out. I could not close the gap completely just enough so no more bees would fly out. The move took about 4 days. They all survived thru the winter.
 

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I too would sell and start again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Dr4ngas. Were they outside in a pickup truck or inside a vehicle? If outside, what temperatures did they experience during the move if you can recall. Thanks.
 

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They were outside in a Nissan Frontier, that was on a auto mover from U-Haul. If memory service the temps were between freezing and 60 degrees.
 

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I'm pretty sure California requires inspection of incoming bees and if you enter on any main highway there are/used to be inspection stations that are checking for plant material but would surely notice bee colonies. Don't know about Washington.
 

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Thanks for the thoughts. I am starting to lean that way. Sucks because I just started over again 2 years ago and these are just getting into their prime. I am concerned that they would struggle during transport as it will be quite cold up in Seattle by the time I get there assuming that is the final destination.
Can you leave them "somewhere" and pick them up in the spring?
 

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Here's a goofy thought...
Bees from all over the US, go to California to pollinate almonds. Maybe you can find a local pollinator that makes the trip to take your bees to Cali then pick them up in March-April . The pollinator will benefit making $400-$600 depending on quality of hives, you will benefit with strong spring hives that are within 1000 miles of your new location. The downside is the trip to go pick em up. I like road trips so might be tempted. Another factor is equipment. If you already use commercial equipment, then your set. BTW, I finished x country trip from Portland Oregon to Jacksonville North Carolina. 4 days.
 
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