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Discussion Starter #1
hi there,

I am a complete newbee.... have been looking to start beekeeping for a bit now. I am building a bee box from plans that I have. here is my question.

I have found a hive in one of the trees on the property. it is small in size. the comb is easy to see as they have started it from a branch in the tree.

how do I move them from there to the new box? can I do it now in the heat of the summer? or should I wait untill it cools down? not sure if it matters, its a lemon tree that they are in, lots of thorns. the bees don't seem to mind me looking around and seem very docile.

thanks for your help.
 

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When they have exposed comb like that, I'd do a cutout. Take the comb and put it in frames using string, elastic, whatever to hold it in place. Put the frames in your box and set it near the tree for a while. Let the stragglers find it and then move it to your final location...unless that IS your final location! If you can't reach them, you can try a swarm lure but I've never had success with that once they've kind of established themselves.
 

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Ravenseye,

When you mean, "Cutout", are we talking about a hot knife slicing sections off like a loaf of bread ?

Had another idea for transferring contents of old hive to new hive:

Use some 2:1 syrup with HBH and an inner frame feeder for a lure in the new hive.
Place the new target hive directly underneath the old hive in tree.
Remove the Outer Lid and leave the inner lid intact without the upper exit hole.
Find some fine mesh screen and cover the old hive (branch and all) to the inner lid cover. Seal off the smaller holes to the wire mesh.
This should force the bees to go through the new hive to get in/out. With some luck, the queen will follow and set up shop in the new home.
Remove the old hive when nearly vacant or when eggs start to appear in new hive.

Later on, if all goes to plan, move the new hive to a different location.

This is just my opinion. Other suggestions or tips welcome.
 

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"cut out" is when he would cut the limb open and cut the comb to fit in frames and tie the comb with string rubberbands or wire or------

It is verry hard to get a hive to move into another box unless you can put directly over the existing coloney, I had a "gum" behind my shop that I put a hive body on and it only took me 3 years to catch the queen in the box then put an excluder under her. I did get 2 or 3 supers of honey off that hive.

This is why I oike beekeeping so much sooooo many different things to try.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thank you for your info.

I may not have been as clear as I would have liked. the hive in the tree is completly open..the comb is just hanging of the limb. It is a very small hive at this point. the tree is smaill...no more then 10 feet tall. with the biggest branch maybe 2 inch's.

If I'm understand what you have said. I should just cut the limb off and move all to the box, keeping the box near the tree?

again thanks for the help. :)
 

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Yep it works and if you ever use them you will never use string or such again
 

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I would just cut the comb off the branch, trim it to fit frames, secure it to the frames and pop it in a box. Nuc if there's not much or a larger box if there's a lot. Watch for the queen and be careful. Keep the box near where you found them for a while and then move them to wherever you want!
 
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