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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How far is a short distance? I have 2 hives that I originally placed badly and want to move one of them 12" and the other one 8" in opposite directions of each other on the same hive stand. There is currently an empty (closed up) hive stack between them, which will be taking on a colony and I am trying to make enough room for one more beside that.

Are these short distances significant enough that need to do something special, or can I just do it during an inspection? I would be more concerned with drift if I were to move them closer together, and I am hoping to have a little time between moving them and adding colonies between them.
 

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How far is a short distance? I have 2 hives that I originally placed badly and want to move one of them 12" and the other one 8" in opposite directions of each other on the same hive stand...I would be more concerned with drift if I were to move them closer together, and I am hoping to have a little time between moving them and adding colonies between them.
You should be fine. I was taught "two feet or two miles".

Anything under 2' will be OK. I routinely swap bottom boards by putting the new bottom board down, taking the stack apart and rebuilding it on the other board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You should be fine. I was taught "two feet or two miles".

Anything under 2' will be OK. I routinely swap bottom boards by putting the new bottom board down, taking the stack apart and rebuilding it on the other board.
Thanks, I thought as much, but figured it wouldn't hurt to ask.
 

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Changing direction of entrance tends to be a problem. Make your move half today and complete the rotation in a couple days.
 

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Changing direction of entrance tends to be a problem. Make your move half today and complete the rotation in a couple days.
Changing direction of entrance?

I don't think anything like that was mentioned.
 

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I once had a hive fall off the stand while on a business trip. No one in my family was going to go set it back up. After I got it back on the stand, I watched bees circle the old spot near the ground for over an hour. It was probably about 4-5 linear feet from the crash location to the restored location. They did eventually figure it out, though it did somewhat prove the 2' or 2 mile idea showing their confusion. Drift shouldn't be an issue. The only potential downfall I see is a little lost labor for some returning foragers.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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move it 3 feet at an inspection, 2 or 3 times and you are there, if re orienting do 1/3 to 1/4 of the twist each time.
I have used a little red wagon, on it the first time , then 1 to 1.5 feet a day, off the wagon the last time. just pull it at dusk.
not going to help if this is a hilly place.

GG
 

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I buy most of my equipment from an older gentleman that told me to put a limb (or weed with leaves) to make them navigate on their way out. He said it resets their GPS. I've heard this technique blasted on forums, but I have used it, Usually when switching ends with an entrance reducer, because if I didn't, a month later I still had bees hitting the old spot. This worked every time. Can't really remember if I've moved a few feet with it.
 

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Go with GG. If I have to move I do it a foot at a time. I lay down 2 2 X 4's in a line, level it, then move them down that track until complete. The advice above is also sage about using limbs and other ways to help them reorient. Their GPS abilities are stunning.

Now when I move just brood frames (with nurse bees) it's less important because they will not move off the brood and stay put.
 
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