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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've heard that moving a hive more than 2 feet and less than 2 miles can cause the bees to strand themselves at the previous location.

Nonetheless, I may be forced to move a hive 50 feet.

Is there a way to pull this off?


Thanks in advance,
spock out
 

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Trap them the night before. Move them to the new location. Put some limbs or brush at the entrance to disorient them which will cause them to reorient. That's about the best advice I can give. You still may have some that will collect at the previous site.
 

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Start moving now then. 2 to 4 yards a day according to ABC.
I do not know if it will help but first rotate the entrance in the opposite direction of which it will move. Then the bees will be aimed in the right direction when they are coming to the hive and may make it easier to find.

Mike
 

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I believe the best way is to move the hive at least two miles away temporarily, if you can. This will take them outside of their range. In a couple of weeks, you can move them back.
If you can't do this, the previous suggestion might work with branches and obstacles.
 

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I didn't have any problem moving one of my hives from one side of my yard to another. About 50 ft.:

1. Go out at night and stuff a bit of grass in the entrance.
2. Move hive to new location.
3. Go back inside and relax.

They will take a little time to remove the grass the next day and then just reorient themselves. It worked for me but results may vary.
 

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I just moved mine about 25 feet to a cooler spot. Some of the girls kinda hung out at the old spot and then drifted over to the new location, eventually. Took about a day, and everything is back to normal.
I did read that they should be moved in small increments...I would guess you could get away with 6 to 10 feet a day.
 

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Just move them. I've moved a few hives this spring and just thrown branches in front of the entrances; sealed up the hive prior to moving. Those hives are doing well.
 

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I was told by another beek on this subject to put a piece of plywood or paneling over the entrance after the move to make the bees have to re-orient. Flying out of the sides of the wood or barrier will prevent them from flying back to the old location. We were talking about making nucs and leaving them in the same yard but I think the concept would still apply.
 

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I've moved 4 hives so far this year, between 20 and 60 feet. Like others, I just seal the entrance at night. Move the hive to it's new location and really pile the brush on the hive being sure to really interfere with the bees flight path. If the hive had top entrances I blocked them and made them use the bottom and vice versa. Haven't had a problem yet. One hive did seem to have a few confused bees at the old location the next day, but by day two all was well...
 

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Due to moisture issues I ended up having to move ours about 20 feet this spring. I moved it and put a branch in front of it. This seemed to help little. They still collected heavily in the old location but over the course of two or three days, the collecting ceased and all was well again.
 
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