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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 30 frame Long Lang that I want to move a hive into before winter. I moved the current Langstroth hive about 10 feet within the same yard so its entrance is close to the entrance of the Long Lang with branches in front. They are reorienting well after 2 days. Now I am wondering how long I should let the colony settle down before transferring. We are alternating between 90 degree days and 60 degree days and are in a drought.
 

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Just move them today and go about your business.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How did your move go?
Thanks for asking. Not terribly well. I moved them, but with little experience with a Long Lang, I should have better waited. With the drought, the move set off a storm of robbing even though I'd kept both the LL and the 10 frame as covered as possible while transferring. Readjusting the frames to keep the brood together kept it open too long. If I'd been thinking properly I'd have thrown a wet sheet over them or just shut them in with extra ventilation for a few days. Ended up having to combine them with a stronger hive. Next time I'll do it earlier in the season now that my long hives are all built.
 

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Sounds like you did not follow the best practices when moving bees - that was the real issue.

As far as the "need to transfer to Long Lang"..
One needs not be opening a long hive when moving - you just move it like moving a chest with stuff in it or a coffin with dead body.
Set the hive where it belongs, open an entrance, and walk (or run!) away.
May very quickly check the frames from above the next day to be sure they did not move - when the bees calm down (hence the next day).

Not to mention, you want to be moving the bees at the very end of the day for a variety of reasons (including prevention of the potential robbing).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This post was from a while back when I was transferring bees from a ten frame hive to a long lang hive. Hard to do that without opening the boxes. :) My question was more to ask if there was a specific need to move the frames differently than with standard langstroth hives since you have to move frame by frame, not just lift a box. I've been working langstroths for 5 years and it was killing my back.
 

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How did your move go?
Sometime, even the best plans will blow up in your face. It is all part of the experience curve. Glad you had the resources sense to join hives. Ultimately, how has that long worked out for you. I have a friend who may need to go to the long hives because he can't handle the heavy hive bodies anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sometime, even the best plans will blow up in your face. It is all part of the experience curve. Glad you had the resources sense to join hives. Ultimately, how has that long worked out for you. I have a friend who may need to go to the long hives because he can't handle the heavy hive bodies anymore.
I have enjoyed the 3 I have right now. One is basically a converted double horizontal Lang that allows me to add honey supers as needed, just need to make sure you balance the heights of the supers (I have a lot of varying heights and if you’re quarter inch off you have issues) and protect the space below where the supers meet. The next 2 are designs from Dr. Leo Sharashkin’s site. One is his basic 30 frame “coffin” box and the other is 33 frames and has a pitched roof. Both have detachable legs made for my height. I like the pitched roof as it allows you to have an attic so I can do more things with feed and it’s easy to super insulate. The walls are 2 inches thick. Our weather ranges from 2 week stretches of over 100 to the same at below zero.
That said - horizontal hives are different and there’s a learning curve as with all things bee. I’ve been running around 12 hives for the past 3 years and will convert to about 8 horizontals. I need to move one of the horizontals to another yard and that’s one sticky point - they’re incredibly heavy - even empty.
 

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I like the pitched roof design. It gives added ventilation opportunity, feeding as well as storage. The ability to put a honey super on sounds like a big plus. You should publish a picture of your modified hive. I would like to see it. I live in San Antonio. We don't really need those extra thick walls for insulation here. I've tried to imagine joining standard boxes but I cant figure out the details that I imagine with bee space.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I like the pitched roof design. It gives added ventilation opportunity, feeding as well as storage. The ability to put a honey super on sounds like a big plus. You should publish a picture of your modified hive. I would like to see it. I live in San Antonio. We don't really need those extra thick walls for insulation here. I've tried to imagine joining standard boxes but I cant figure out the details that I imagine with bee space.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I like the pitched roof design. It gives added ventilation opportunity, feeding as well as storage. The ability to put a honey super on sounds like a big plus. You should publish a picture of your modified hive. I would like to see it. I live in San Antonio. We don't really need those extra thick walls for insulation here. I've tried to imagine joining standard boxes but I cant figure out the details that I imagine with bee space.
I have enjoyed the 3 I have right now. One is basically a converted double horizontal Lang that allows me to add honey supers as needed, just need to make sure you balance the heights of the supers (I have a lot of varying heights and if you’re quarter inch off you have issues) and protect the space below where the supers meet. The next 2 are designs from Dr. Leo Sharashkin’s site. One is his basic 30 frame “coffin” box and the other is 33 frames and has a pitched roof. Both have detachable legs made for my height. I like the pitched roof as it allows you to have an attic so I can do more things with feed and it’s easy to super insulate. The walls are 2 inches thick. Our weather ranges from 2 week stretches of over 100 to the same at below zero.
That said - horizontal hives are different and there’s a learning curve as with all things bee. I’ve been running around 12 hives for the past 3 years and will convert to about 8 horizontals. I need to move one of the horizontals to another yard and that’s one sticky point - they’re incredibly heavy - even empty.
61939

This is a 20 frame box on top of two conjoined screened bottom boards (manufactured) and a telescoping top to fit. Below is the interior of 2 commercially made old 10 frame boxes conjoined with the same bottom board arrangement. I’m a lousy carpenter. A modified frame resides in the restricted joined area to allow proper bee space.
I
61940
61941
 
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