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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So a few weeks ago I posted a question about moving hives less than the recommended two miles. I did as instructed; moved in the evening and placed grass in the entrance and some branches in front of the hive.
Not enough branches? too close? not sure what happened.
So now I have a practically empty hive, with no evidence of the queen and very few capped brood cells. We had a cold spell after the move, and with insufficient bees, it looks like they got chilled brood, which are now all piled at the bottom of the brood box. So...I just reduced the hive to one brood box and stole two frames of brood w/ bees(from the hive that was previously closest to where the old hive was, and is now OVERFLOWING with bees) and put them in the hive. I placed more grass in the entrance and put a bucket with some branches in front of the hive.
There is a queen cell in the making right now, so perhaps they can get a new queen on board and get to work. But is my new queen going to be too late?
 

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Maybe this is a dumb question, but....did you remove the grass blocking the entrance after you moved the bees? How long did you keep them shut in the hive?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
grass was lightly placed in front of entrance. not stuffed closed. Just enough to make them have to push it out, as was suggested. I kind of think that they didn't really reorient and they all went back to the hive that was nearest to their old location.
Just want to determine how to get this hive back in shape for summer...if it ever comes to Montana.
 

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from your description, it sounds like your hive swarmed while you were not watching. I say this because you say you have no queen but you do have a queencell. I am not sure that you should blame it on the move.
 

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i think you will be fine. i am just raising queens and splitting hives right now also. if the hive is low on numbers add a couple more frames of brood from your other hive. it has been way to cold and rainy for much to happen yet anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
hmmm. didn't consider a swarm. seems too early, but there are definitely signs that that could have been the case. I guess that I will just hope for the best and keep moving frames to keep them going until the new queen shows up!
Kwest, how are your bees doing in Manhattan? this has certainly been a tough spring so far.
 

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How far were they moved as a crow flies? A single queen cell(or even a few more) not on the bottom of the frames could of been caused from the queen getting killed during the move. A hive will normally not swarm and leave a bunch of brood to get chilled.

My guess is the queen was killed during the move and all your foragers are in the hive that was left at the original place
 

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man its been a rough spring. i got 2 nucs of bees from georgia and they are doing great. i have just split a hive made 1/2 queenless to raise some queens for more splits. went out last night to pull a bunch queen cells and make more splits and most of the queens were already hatched. Ill be trying another round of raising queens here in a few weeks. if you end up needing a queen you can give me a holler later i may have a extra queen cell if you want one. i may end up have some extra queens this summer. I am sick of paying big money in shipping to get queens here so i am going to raise queens and nucs and sell what i dont need. if the weather warms up and it quits raining the bees should be going gangbusters on the pollen and nectar soon. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How far were they moved as a crow flies? A single queen cell(or even a few more) not on the bottom of the frames could of been caused from the queen getting killed during the move. A hive will normally not swarm and leave a bunch of brood to get chilled.

My guess is the queen was killed during the move and all your foragers are in the hive that was left at the original place
dont think the queen could have been killed in the move. We literally strapped the hive together, put a piece of tape over the entrance, moved it about a hundred yards, took the tape off and put some grass in the entrance. we carried the hive the distance by hand. so not sure how the queen would have been wiped out.

kwest, I have never split hives or made nucs myself, but would love to see how you are doing it. that would certainly help me out since i don't think i've made it a summer yet without needing a new queen.
 

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Do your frames fit loose in the hive bodies? Did you tilt the hive sideways when carrying it? Unless they already had swarm cells started when you moved them(200 yds:doh:) they wouldn't swarm after all the foragers went to the other hive. After they lost most of there population they were vulverable to being roobed if you had a large entrance. That could cause the queen to get killed also.
 

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If you added some brood from another hive with a reasonable amount of nurse bees, you should be OK. If that queen cell works out, you'll be queenright before you bees get too old. A small amount of bees and a small amount of brood is better than a small amount of bees and a large brood area. If you have few foragers and if your frames are light, I'd feed to be safe. Oh...and be patient!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
that makes me feel a bit more confident. I moved two frames with a lot of bees and brood. they had two full frames of capped honey that I fed back to them this spring. I previously had been feeding them, but they hadn't really been taking it very quickly. so perhaps they will get it all figured out and the queen will happen.
Thanks for all of your suggestions.
 
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