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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We mouse proof are lower entrances with mouse guards what about the upper entrance ! I've been keeping the hole for upper entrance at 7/16'' dia. to keep them out anything bigger they could probably get in but wonder if its enough ventilation .
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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I run all upper entrances with no guards. The only hives I find with a mouse in them, the mouse has chewed a hole to get in at the bottom. I'm sure the mice can climb up to the top, but they don't seem to be willing to.
 

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Mice may not be able to climb, but I know shrews can, as I have watched them do it.

Shrews look like "mice" (small brown furry creatures) but they are blessed (or cursed) with a metabolism that makes them need food almost constantly 24/7. They're like food junkies in that they will keep pushing and pushing to get in. And they want to eat protein, too, not just honey. Shrews are after brood. Luckily for some beekeepers, shrews are not as evenly distributed in North America, nor are they as common.

Even though my stacks are quite tall, and my upper entrances are covered with cardboard and wood wind baffles, I use a piece of 1/2" hardware cloth over the actual hole from mid/late January onward. I use thumb tacks to attach it, for ease of installation and removal. Pro tip: if it's well below freezing the wood of the boxes will hard as a rock, so pick a warmer day to install the barriers.

Nancy
 

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Shrews look like "mice" (small brown furry creatures) but they are blessed (or cursed) with a metabolism that makes them need food almost constantly 24/7. They're like food junkies in that they will keep pushing and pushing to get in. And they want to eat protein, too, not just honey. Shrews are after brood. Luckily for some beekeepers, shrews are not as evenly distributed in North America, nor are they as common.

Nancy
Shrews are not really active in winter in cold climate since they will not survive (just ain't much food around for them).
When shrews are active, bees are active too, hence not much a concern (again, in cold climate).
 

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Mice can climb. Last winter I found one living in a quilt box, who had chewed through the screen over the ventilation hole (I foolishly used fiberglass screen, rather than metal wire mesh). But I think bees should be able to defend the top entrance, since it is near the cluster and fairly warm (may not be the case where it gets really cold in winter).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I will see if my 7/16 hole is enough ventilation when I take my insulation board and inner cover off to add sugar bricks and see if there is any condensation on them otherwise I think I am mouse proof .
 
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