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Just wondering if I can go ahead and take them off since winter is half over...
 

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>Would it hurt to go a little bigger on the mesh sizing so this would not happen?

I went to 1/2" mesh primarily so the drones wouldn't get stuck and plug it up. Keeps Maine mice out.

I've got "poor man's slatted racks" on 3 of my hive so I didn't bother with mouse guards on those hives. These are 4" x 14 3/4" x 3/8" plywood inserts, held up 3/8" off the bottom board, slid into the hive about 3". The bees seem to like them, they tended to use one side to enter the hive and the other to leave t. Supposedly mice won't try to squeeze in one of those. So far, they haven't.
 

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Michael

what would you consider to be the benchmark for when you can remove mouseguards?
your weather is very different than NC
I would consider that once the maples bloom and there are frequent days the bees are flying you'd be ok, but I'm still a newbie

Dave

[ January 27, 2007, 07:00 PM: Message edited by: drobbins ]
 

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I am thinking about next winter.....
Because I won't be getting my nucs until April or May of this year.
I have not had to winter them yet.
My newbee thinking is........
Next fall I will be putting an entrance reducer on to winter the bees.
When spring comes should I remove the entrance reducer and add the mouse guard?
 

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no

the mice will try to move into the hive in the fall when the weather gets cold.
you want to put a mouse guard on then to stop them.
in the spring is to late.
we're talking about when to remove them in the spring

Dave
 

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I leave the mouse mesh shoved into my entrances
until the apple bloom, when one can be certain
of no clustering. I've not noticed any pollen
being knocked off foragers, and I use 1/2-inch
mesh.

Once the bees are not clustered, they can
drive off any voles or mice that want to
wander in, and by then, the incentive to set
up shop in a beehive (cold weather) is gone.
 

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Bee, I took off my reducer and replaced it with a mouse guard. It was the kind made of out stainless steel and full of small holes. Later, when the weather (finally) got colder, I worried that the full length mouse guard would let in too much draft so I stapled a small length of metal flashing over about 3/4 of the entrance. So, my hive opening is about the size of a reduced entrance hive but still protected by the mouse guard. I wish there was an integrated guard/reducer so that I could put the mouse guard in place early in the fall and the reduce as the weather and wind got bad.
 

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George, Jim, Michael, catch a mouse and cage him in a 1/2 in. mesh wire cage and you will change your mind. They will go through it like it wasn't even there. I raised mice and rats for years to feed reptiles. It takes 3/8 mesh to cage mice.

Rather than using 2 or 3 different strategies, why not make an entrance reducer with a 3/8 in. high opening and be done with it?
 

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>catch a mouse and cage him in a 1/2 in. mesh wire cage and you will change your mind.
This may be so with caged mice, but I don't see them getting through the 1/2" entrance screens...nearly 800 each winter.

>why not make an entrance reducer with a 3/8 in. high opening and be done with it?

I have seen mice chew the opening larger, and get through.

All that said..."never say never."
 
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