Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have tried most mouse guards and would like some feed back on what you use for the winter, I want to have a parial closure of the entrance and also preclude mice from entering. The old fashioned wooden ones work but they can get pulled out by animals. I saw some metal ones that require screwing claps on both sides.I also like to have the bees have the ability to clean out dead bees rather than have them trapped at the bottom.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,822 Posts
I use a fixed 4.5" entrance but same concept as an installed entrance reducer. Clipped the bottom of the metal to provide unobstructed entrance/exit on the BB. The screws in this pic allow the guard to be removed by simply loosening the screws but most are spaced where one of the screws must be completely removed.

IMG_0491.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Very creative and simple/
I use a fixed 4.5" entrance but same concept as an installed entrance reducer. Clipped the bottom of the metal to provide unobstructed entrance/exit on the BB. The screws in this pic allow the guard to be removed by simply loosening the screws but most are spaced where one of the screws must be completely removed.

View attachment 50993
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,326 Posts
I use a fixed 4.5" entrance but same concept as an installed entrance reducer. Clipped the bottom of the metal to provide unobstructed entrance/exit on the BB. The screws in this pic allow the guard to be removed by simply loosening the screws but most are spaced where one of the screws must be completely removed.

View attachment 50993
what material did you use?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,326 Posts
I use these. Found getting them to work required trimming the bottom board sides if they protruded further out then the box. I spray painted them when i got them. Not cheap but good quality. Nice when using an oav wand. The sides are screwed to the bottom box so doing things like reversing boxes in spring becomes a problem. Think i got mine on Ebay. I like that they can be reversed and used when moving hives or stopping a robbing event.
Haven't had a mouse since. Got to put them on soon. Like now. Or make sure you double check you don't have any mice in there before you trap them in.
For winter I run a top entrance as well. I don't show the bees will clean up dead in winter unless they have several warm days.

https://www.amazon.com/Eastbuy-Beeh...=gateway&sprefix=beehive+entr,aps,145&sr=8-11
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,822 Posts
I get it from a local but it's like a 16 gauge mild steel with 1/4" holes. Even expanded metal will work; a pencil is a good go/no go gauge, if a pencil will fit through - so can a bee.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,260 Posts
I use these. Found getting them to work required trimming the bottom board sides if they protruded further out then the box. I spray painted them when i got them. Not cheap but good quality. Nice when using an oav wand. The sides are screwed to the bottom box so doing things like reversing boxes in spring becomes a problem. Think i got mine on Ebay. I like that they can be reversed and used when moving hives or stopping a robbing event.
Haven't had a mouse since. Got to put them on soon. Like now. Or make sure you double check you don't have any mice in there before you trap them in.
For winter I run a top entrance as well. I don't show the bees will clean up dead in winter unless they have several warm days.

https://www.amazon.com/Eastbuy-Beeh...=gateway&sprefix=beehive+entr,aps,145&sr=8-11
Those are the same ones I like. I got a 3 pack for $11 a few months ago, but it is no longer available. I think the slots work better for the bees to clean the hive and I have put an entrance reducer behind the mouse guard or taped over some slots on smaller hives in the winter. I did have to trim them down with tin snips because they are a bit wide, but it only takes a minute. I got tired of messing with the brackets and just started driving 2 screws with a large flat under the head thru the holes in the top to hold them on.

Here are the ones I got https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07K8BMC6H/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I use a screw like this to hold them on, anything with a flat flange under the head will probably work fine
https://www.amazon.com/Rok-Hardware...s=lathe+screw&qid=1566972829&s=gateway&sr=8-7

edit: I dont know why the listing for the mouse guard on amazon is messed up, but the picture is still right
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
950 Posts
I use a 1 1/2 X 14 1/2 in piece of 1/2 in hardware cloth ,folded in a V, and pushed in the gap,year round.Bees don't mind.
For smaller hives or robbing situations,I nail a length of 1x1 on one side of the gap to reduce the width.
The important thing is to allow the bees to bring out the dead but also provide enough height so that a layer of dead bees does not block the entrance
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
171 Posts
The hives I use have a permanently attached mouse guard and adjustable entrance reducer.

90c2a7df2d1eb78e65752f7716032869f4c47f99.jpg

It's handy but there are cheaper ways to accomplish the same thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
I buy metal strips with 3/8 inch holes from Home Depot. Cut the strips so that just 4 holes are left. Put that in the entrance and cover the rest of the entrance with wood and secure with screws.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
451 Posts
Hello,

I was looking for 1/2" mesh, but my hardware store only had roles of 50 yard, so no go. Then I found this
2.jpg 2.jpg

Applied with the fall/spring reducer like this and stapled to the reducer later, so it can be removed with the reducer for bottom board cleaning.
7.jpg

Cheers, Joerg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I just drill a few 3/8 holes in a piece of corner bead. Remove the entrance reducer, screw it in place with one screw. One 10 foot piece of corner bead costs about $2 and will net you about 8 pieces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,135 Posts
a mouse can fit through a 1/2 in. hole. It would seem 1/2" mesh is to big. Alex
Disturbed a mouse out of an empty nuc, she ran full speed through the 3/8 gap and into another empty nuc with six good sized babies hanging onto her teats. Didn't even slow down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,558 Posts
a mouse can fit through a 1/2 in. hole. It would seem 1/2" mesh is to big.

Alex
That depends quite a bit on the shape of the hole and the angle of it. If the 1/2" mesh is angled to the approach it gives decent assurance. I think Michael Palmer addressed this and folds the mesh into a sharp V that he wedges into the entrance.

I have been using a 3/8 deep notch with a row of upright brads at about 5/16 - 3/8" spacing. Mouse proof but shrews could still squeeze through. They are not as plentiful as mice though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,540 Posts
I use a wooden entrance reducer (small notch open, facing up). And a piece of 1/2" mesh hardware cloth bent at a right angle, attached over the entrance reducer with push pins on the face of the box and on the bottom board. Hardware cloth is slightly undersized so I can move it horizontally so that its wires and the edges of notch can be offset making the opening less than 1/2" wide. My bees primarily use their upper entrance during the winter (even if they are strongly bottom-entrance oriented during the summer.) It's so cold here most of the winter that they don't haul out the dead very often. Once a month, or so I remove the entrance reducers and use a stick to clear them out.

I agree with Frank, shrews are smaller, though thankfully not as common as field/deer mice. However they eat brood so their effects are more troubling.

Nancy
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top