Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure where to start this so here goes...

Low 70s today in SC and decided to check the hives here at the house to see if they neede a super added. One hive in particular had reduced numbers from a month ago when I reversed brood boxes and placed a couple of open frames in the brood box. I also checker boarded the one super.
Long story short, did not observe any brood in the upper brood box, although there were a small number of bees throughout the upper boxes. What I did notice was A LOT of drones??? I went into the lower box and found a sporadic amount of eggs on the 3-4 frames in the center. There was also a small amount of drone brood along the bottom and edges where you would expect to see it. I finally spotted the queen. She is the smallest queen I have ever observed. I do not think she was the one in there through the winter and last month when I did the box reversals.

I would like to get some suggestions on how I should proceed with this hive.

Should I give her another week to see if she is a new queen and not mated/ and or not laying yet?

I have a couple of NUCS with queens that are going to town so should I give the hive a frame of mixed/capped brood and wait?

OR, should I replace her and combine one of the NUCS with it?

Finally, should I shake all the bees out and not waste resources?

Thanks for any and all suggestions.
 

·
Registered
5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
Joined
·
3,381 Posts
hmm a guess on my part....
the box reversal, ended up with a squished queen.
they made an E queen
either you saw a virgin or a runtish queen.

give them a couple weeks, re check if there is no brood, harvest the frames for splits or other hives.

if in a couple weeks this looks the same, shake bees from the frames, and give 1/2 to each NUC, that is somewhat what they are for is replacements when needed.

Insure it is not a mite out or some other bee pest issue prior to adding the frames to other good hives.

GG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks GG. Kind of what I thought. I figured I was the one who inadvertently took out the original queen. My thoughts as stated above was wait until this Sunday, which will be a week, and see if the eggs I saw are worker brood. If they are drone brood I can pull the smallish queen over to a nuc and give her a little more time and requeen with a new mated queen. one of my NUC queens or one of some purchased queens I am picking up this weekend to bring in some different genetics. I would hate to take her out if she is just getting started. I Reckon I could put a frame of mixed brood in there from one of the NUCs and see what happens in the meantime..

Just throwing some thoughts out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,047 Posts
Having the bees become laying worker is the thing to avoid. Sounds like you have some fairly short term options but if not it would be better to combine the bees with another colony and split them off later; that way their usefulness is not lost. Not much to be lost by giving the suspect queen another chance but I would replace her later anyway. Dont chance having her run out of eggs and cause the loss of colony. A queen of questionable mating is not the best investment long term.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,081 Posts
Kill the questionable Q and introduce the Q from the nuc.
The questionable hive sounds like a dud Q which means non viable eggs and most likely a shortage of nurse bees. You will not get them to raise a good Q.

If the nuc is doing well, with a flow they will have no problem raising an emergency Q.
Or you could combine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all for the suggestions. I think I will give it until Saturday and make a move. Replace her with one of the Nuc queens.

Question: Should I place in the new queen in a #8 cage on a frame of capped brood after removing the current queen or doing a news paper combine of the whole nuc?

OR???? Thanks...
 

·
Moderator - In Memorium
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,882 Posts
Probably be better to combine the whole nuc, then split it back out in a month or so.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ranger N

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,047 Posts
Probably be better to combine the whole nuc, then split it back out in a month or so.
Yes, putting her in with her own bees is safer. If you are introducing an expensive queen after some time has passed queenless you definitely should check scrupulously for started cells. Just to have the idea available, think about using a push in introduction cage especially if mixing in queens consisting of Russian and Italian background. I have lost a few queens because the workers decided they wanted to raise their own queen. It costs me 65$ to get a queen shipped to the north.
 

·
Registered
5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
Joined
·
3,381 Posts
Thanks all for the suggestions. I think I will give it until Saturday and make a move. Replace her with one of the Nuc queens.

Question: Should I place in the new queen in a #8 cage on a frame of capped brood after removing the current queen or doing a news paper combine of the whole nuc?

OR???? Thanks...
if it were my choice, I would newspaper combine on top of the existing hive over a double excluder your NUC, complete as is, if the NUC is 5 frame and the hive 10 center the NUC in a 10 frame box and add some comb to each side.
with her bees in her nest she will be fine. In 3 weeks go back in, either you have eggs in the bottom or not, likely not so then put the NUC queen and box on the bottom, add the other deep then excluder, shake any thing in front you do not need and take it.. If you have eggs in the bottom find the Queen put her in a NUC and pull her out , then do the above after pulling the queen.

By taking the queen out of her own nest and cadging and releasing you run some risk. simply combining with resect for the possible 2 queen scenario you are in less risk IMO.


up to you do what is most comfortable. Could even swap the NUC with the Hive in question and then deal with the other hive as needed on the side.

GG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
if it were my choice, I would newspaper combine on top of the existing hive over a double excluder your NUC, complete as is, if the NUC is 5 frame and the hive 10 center the NUC in a 10 frame box and add some comb to each side.
with her bees in her nest she will be fine. In 3 weeks go back in, either you have eggs in the bottom or not, likely not so then put the NUC queen and box on the bottom, add the other deep then excluder, shake any thing in front you do not need and take it.. If you have eggs in the bottom find the Queen put her in a NUC and pull her out , then do the above after pulling the queen.

By taking the queen out of her own nest and cadging and releasing you run some risk. simply combining with resect for the possible 2 queen scenario you are in less risk IMO.


up to you do what is most comfortable. Could even swap the NUC with the Hive in question and then deal with the other hive as needed on the side.

GG
So, GG, i can combine the 5 frame medium nuc via news paper on top of the 10 frame deep as JW stated earlier as well, by transferring to a 10 frame medium. This after I remove the weak queen in the existing hive for say 24 hrs.

Something similar I take it? Thanks..
 

·
Registered
5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
Joined
·
3,381 Posts
So, GG, i can combine the 5 frame medium nuc via news paper on top of the 10 frame deep as JW stated earlier as well, by transferring to a 10 frame medium. This after I remove the weak queen in the existing hive for say 24 hrs.

Something similar I take it? Thanks..
sure,if you remove the weak queen.
Also keep looking in case there are more than one queen.
the "weak" queen could be a virgin, I have seen several, so do take care looking thru, OR use a double excluder.
they could fight on a single excluder, one on each side.

GG
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top