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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Around these parts, the month of March and April are deadout months. Weak colonies on the edge may succumb. Looking at the forecast, we're not going to get thrown much of a bone.

For some of us in the frozen cold climates of the north, next week may be the first cleansing flight.

Good luck. May the honey frames be ever near your clusters.
 

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Thankfully I only have about a month left until supers go on, but yes, the next 4 weeks are real nail biters.
 

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Around these parts, the month of March and April are deadout months. Weak colonies on the edge may succumb. Looking at the forecast, we're not going to get thrown much of a bone.

For some of us in the frozen cold climates of the north, next week may be the first cleansing flight.

Good luck. May the honey frames be ever near your clusters.
In the frozen north.
First cleansing fight? since when, February? 😆

If the bees In Sussex NJ or NE PA need feed in late winter then feed them.

If they are weak now, they are already dead and don't know it. And they
are nearly useless to the beekeeper.
 

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We are seeing some orientation flights. They will be sucking down the resources in earnest now, although the clusters are starting out a little smaller this year.

Alex
 

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Why the gloom? There are ways to get emergency feed into them as Clyderoad says. You can always open the top of the stack and pour sugar onto a newspaper, spritz it with a little water and close it up. Bees will eat sugar slurry during the cold months even if they won't go for the liquid. You can also slip in a pollen pattie for them to eat while raising brood or feed dry pollen in an open feeding situation.

What cannot be hidden is lack of winter prep against mites and feeding to weight. Hope is not a strategy. Taking action is.
 

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I just pulled the MC sugar off all my colonies yesterday and put on baggie feeders. I identified several colonies that are only a few seams of bees. It is too cold here to be moving frames of brood but what I will probably do is take those weak sisters and stack them over my strongest colonies. I put a spacer in between two queen excluders to keep the queens from reaching each other, but I want nurse bees smelling brood above drifting up to suppliment the weaker colonies populations. On occasion doing this, the flow has bee heavy when a failing queen below was not as attractive as the bee less one above and the top hive became the strong booming colony. That works too. If the ploy fails due to the small colony queen being subrate, that is valuable too in that her population transfers to the strong side and you waste no more time on a failing colony.
 

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Bees were out flying a bit a few days ago when it hit 40 degrees. Nice to see them. I added some sugar blocks.
 

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we had a few warmish days last couple weeks then back to the brutal cold. Supposed to be in the 50s here in a few days so a chance to take a look through the apiary.
I have one confirmed dead out so far this year out of the 50-60 colonies i took into winter. Its a small late september swarm. I didnt give it much hope and i was right sadly.
 

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Mid to upper 50's forecasted for a few days next week, possibly hitting the low 60's with lows in the mid 40's. My girls have been flying all winter whenever it gets above 40 or so and I think we'll be able to get into the hives an assess where we're at, hopefully correct any deficiencies and move towards spring. OAV and some pollen seems to be the initial plan.
 

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I have added food x2 for a few of the hives, others have not needed it. The few are huge hives. Next week we hit 60 we are going to try and do quick inspections.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Quick question here:

What's beesource's opinion on feeding dry pollen sub during the warm 3 days in the forecast next week.

I do not want to stimulate brood rearing, will the bees just pack away the pollen sub and wait for warmer weather?

Thanks.
 

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I would take my opinion with a grain of salt but unless some one who I consider reliable chimes in with a "don't do it or we'll all die' comment, that my plan for next week. Current forecast is us in NJ for well above freezing at night and upper 50/low 60's Tuesday through the end of the week and then a light cooling by next weekend. Of course my Dad used to say that the best forecast was if your head was wet, it raining. Watch the forecast and do it, my girls took the pollen pretty well the other day and its time to get them working again. Figure even if we get some cold nights, they should be accelerating brood-the cycle would put any brood next week into early April and that should be good for here. Daffodils are now 6" out of the dirt in our garden after the melt off last week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Daffodils aren't doing much in my area yet.

My primary objective would be to keep the bees busy so they don't annoy the neighbors, but if it's going to be a cold march, early brood rearing could cause issues.
 

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For all of you with no location information provided, and who say "its cold here". Where's "here"? A beekeeper's most difficult month is location dependent.

Here in Denver, we are getting 50F-60F days for the next handful of days. Bees typically start brooding in mid-January. I've already got new worker bees and drones in my hives. I did the season's first OA treatment on March 3. Bees are now starting to hit my water sources. Syrup jars and pollen sub will go on about mid-March. First blooms (silver maple) starts in early April.
 

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For all of you with no location information provided, and who say "its cold here". Where's "here"? A beekeeper's most difficult month is location dependent.

Here in Denver, we are getting 50F-60F days for the next handful of days. Bees typically start brooding in mid-January. I've already got new worker bees and drones in my hives. I did the season's first OA treatment on March 3. Bees are now starting to hit my water sources. Syrup jars and pollen sub will go on about mid-March. First blooms (silver maple) starts in early April.
Skaneateles NY here. Its currently 16F outside with16mph winds gusting to 24mph and a real feel of 7F.
COLD!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Skaneateles NY here. Its currently 16F outside with16mph winds gusting to 24mph and a real feel of 7F.
COLD!
Yep, my climate is very similar because of the elevation.

Frozen northern beekeepers must tough it out for another month and a half!
 
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