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Discussion Starter #1
a hive "chimney" that would allow rising hot air to escape is an idea that was briefly mentioned on a forum. The question got me to thinking and as I was out with my dogs this evening I had an idea: Drilling holes into the length of a "false" top bar, stapling on some screening and placing these bars on the ends next to the follower boards (for center entrance hives). Rising hot air would easily exit which would especially reduce condensation over the winter months. I wonder how the bees would like this...and how they would react. Ideas?
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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I have not seen a lot of ventilation issues with horizontal hives. There is no hieght to really create a chimney effect but it also doesn't seem to be necessary. With a tall hive and no chimney effect they have to move all the hot moist air from the top to the bottom against the natural tendency for it to rise. This is not an issue in a horizontal hive.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Michael,
Humidity wreaked havoc in my first two TBHs this past winter - probably because I made them too tight. Lots of green and black mold and I estimate about half of my colony dead on the floor covered by mold when I opened it up. The other hive I have - which was constructed a little differently with a front entrance - fared badly but not as bad as this one.

I have side a entrance in this one, a la the style of Phil Chandler. So I decided to drill 3 holes on the same side but up toward the top - about 1 1/2 inches down to help relieve the humidity and ventilate the hive better - respecting the principle of a simple convection current. What have you been doing to promote good ventilation?

That idea in my first post seemed like a good idea so I thought I'd ask for some input.
 

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Michael,
Humidity wreaked havoc in my first two TBHs this past winter - probably because I made them too tight. Lots of green and black mold and I estimate about half of my colony dead on the floor covered by mold when I opened it up. The other hive I have - which was constructed a little differently with a front entrance - fared badly but not as bad as this one.

I have side a entrance in this one, a la the style of Phil Chandler. So I decided to drill 3 holes on the same side but up toward the top - about 1 1/2 inches down to help relieve the humidity and ventilate the hive better - respecting the principle of a simple convection current. What have you been doing to promote good ventilation?

That idea in my first post seemed like a good idea so I thought I'd ask for some input.
I had the same problem this winter with my hives, so I added some holes to the floor and moved the entrance to the top at one end. The entrances seem to be exhausting warm moist air a lot better now as far as I can tell.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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I have only a top entrance on mine, which lets the moisture out, and usually put some styrofoam on the lid, which cuts down on the condensation. This is sufficient in my climate. I can't say for yours, but I think a top entrance makes a world of difference as does the insulated lid. I haven't found anything else that helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Michael,
Good point. Now that I have the holes on top intended for ventilation, the bees could use these for entrances too. Let's see how this progresses.
 
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