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Discussion Starter #1
A shed that I had supers stored in blew over (well, the roof blew off) about 2 weeks ago (on 'vacation') and... A LOT of rain has made its way in there and into the comb.

Now I am not particularly scared of (putting bees on slightly) moldy comb and I spent most of the day moving them to a new covered area, but... there is a lot of moisture on these frames right now and I want to save them as best as I can. I dont think it is practical to heat the area but I put a fan blowing over them...

I am concerned because some of the supers (stored in the fall) were moldy -black or green mold - to the point where I would normally start to consider trashing frames.

Many more have standing water in them and significant amt of mold already

I am thinking I may try to spray (or dip?) frames all down with mild bleach.... but.... lot of work and they will still be wet when the chlorine evaporates


your thoughts greatly appreciated
 

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I would not recommend the use of bleach. Air them out and when you put them back on the bees will take care of cleaning them up.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am in WA state whatcom county... Not CO It has been an odd and mostly warm winter for the most part 40- almost 50 degrees the last week. Bees are even bringing in hazelnut pollen as of sunday this is at least 2+ weeks early.



but anyways, ok sure the worst ones I probably should/ will trash but that doesn't really answer my question.

The majority aren't that bad but many have mold beginning to develop and they now have standing water still even though I am in the process of 'airing them out' ... I am worried that it will get worse AND want to take some sort of ACTION to save the rest of my comb but I have no idea what to do. thanks.





also I don't think that bleach would be a bad thing BeeTeach why do you say that??? I know it has been 'tested' for sterilizing equipment to various diseases and found to be not ideal for that, but it should kill the mold, right? chlorine will evaporate....
 

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Yes, chlorine gas will evaporate. But I am not aware if there are any residuals. If for no other reason I just wouldn't want the possibility of something contaminating the wax that will be storage for honey for human consumption. And, unless this comb is way beyond salvage, it is not necessary. The bees will remove the mold.
 

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Bfriendly-
you think whatcom county is warm this winter ..... you should come down to Skagit County ,...... freaking heat wave ---

i havent seen any pollen coming in yet but i have seen bees out buzzin today and its been raining like crazy -

odd year - but after last year...... well..... the east coast can keep it !!!!!

also on the mold ... i use GSE... grapefruit seed extract ... it kills mold and is not harmful for the bees - or you !!!

Seth
 

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I would not recommend the use of bleach.QUOTE]

A good number of beekeepers are having very good success using a bleach(not clorox but chemical grade[pure]) water solution for cleaning up nosema infected comb.

Read these in order 1 2 3

3 http://community.lsoft.com/scripts/...1=BEE-L&9=A&J=on&d=No+Match;Match;Matches&z=4

2 http://community.lsoft.com/scripts/...1=BEE-L&9=A&J=on&d=No+Match;Match;Matches&z=4

1 http://community.lsoft.com/scripts/[email protected]&d=No+Match;Match;Matches&z=4
 

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I have dealt with mold on frames before. Once you dry them out good the mold will stop growing. With no moisture mold can not grow. As long as they are no BAD moldy the bees will clean them up faster than you can. If the mold is bad and heavy then melting those would be advisable. But the ones that are not heavy molded dry them out and give back to bees.
 

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I'm curious, the mold, a fungus, has cell walls made of chitin, a protein. Does anyone know if the bees eat the mold, or just remove it? An informed answer may help decide if it's better to leave mold on the comb or kill it. Thanks. Paul
 

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Discussion Starter #11
In every sort of (small scale I will admit) food processing I have been involved with bleach / water solution is used to sterilize. From some restaurants, fish processing, brewing, to cleaning the old extractor and honey house...

Thanks for the links Beeslave a followup bee-l archive search is turning up some hits!

household bleach I believe is a 5% solution of sodium hypochlorite
In the pool supply stores I believe you can buy 30%

OR should I look somewhere else to buy something "food grade"?

Can anyone suggest a concentration that they have used safely and as a side benefit may be effective in sterilizing for Nosema ?
Application method (insecticide type garden sprayer or dip of whole boxes w/ frames)
AND how to best "dry off" the resulting comb

thanks for the input!!
 

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If you go to Bee-L and search "bleach" there are many more postings. Some where in there is a formula that a mermber has had very good success with.
 
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