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My paying job is as a controls technician; HVAC building controls. I need to control humidity and a chart is helpful. For example, if the air handling unit is bringing in 55 deg air at 100% humidity from the outside, it needs to be heated to 70 deg which brings the humidity to 50% for the inside.

Is there a similar relationship for honey moisture? The paper which came with the refractometer says it was calibrated at a certain temperature.

So when I am testing my honey in the 95 deg honey house is the moisture relatively high (like relative humidity in the air)?
 

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boone.....
My view is that if you calibrate your refracto meter with distilled water that is the same temp that the honey is, then check the honey, You will know what the moister content of the honey is. Secondly. There are probly charts on line that would show how to adjust the reading of the refracto meter base on temp differrent then it was calabrated for that would tell you the water content of the honey. In the end if you read the meter correctly for the situation, you will know what your honey water content is when you bottle it.
I hope this help or at minimum can at least be understood a little.
Good luck
gww
 

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My paying job is as a controls technician; HVAC building controls. I need to control humidity and a chart is helpful. For example, if the air handling unit is bringing in 55 deg air at 100% humidity from the outside, it needs to be heated to 70 deg which brings the humidity to 50% for the inside.

Is there a similar relationship for honey moisture?
No.

Relative humidity pertains to water vapor in air, not to water in liquids.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relative_humidity
 

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Instructions

1 Open the daylight plate of the refractometer. This is a glass plate on the opposite end of the refractometer from the eyepiece. The plate covers a prism.

2 Place two or three drops of distilled water on the plate. Close the daylight plate. The water should form a solid sheet on the prism. Allow the water to stand for a minute so that the water assumes the same temperature as the refractometer.

3 Lift the refractometer. Look through the eyepiece at a light source.

4 Look at the circular field of view. The upper part will be blue and the lower part will be white. In the center of the field, there will be lines of gradation. This is the Brix scale of refraction.

5 Locate the calibration screw on the top of the refractometer. This should be close to the end with the prism, since the screw changes the prism's angle of refraction.

6 Twist the screw in both directions until the line where the white portion of the field meets the blue portion is exactly at zero.

7 Open the daylight plate and clean the water off the plate and the prism before measuring any other samples.
 

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I think it depends on the design range of your refractometer; mine wont take any readings even close to being calibrated with distilled water. You will need a fluid with a higher brix index if your refractometer measures up in the 60 - 90 brix range. Brewing refractometers that measure in the 0 - 25 brix range could be calibrated with distilled water though. Some are supposed to self compensate for temperature variation. Mine is, but I still try to have the sample around 68 deg.

I have played with using both virgin olive oil which is supposed to read ~71.5 brix or pure glycerine (available at drug store) for checking calibration, which from memory should read 73 but verify that before you use it. Both liquids were very close to the factory setting and that showed all the honey I tested to be within the 17 - 18 % moisture range so I felt comfortable with that method for the accuracy I needed.

There are several threads here on the forum you could search up on calibration of refractometers.
 
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