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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There is moisture collecting on the inner cover. It may not be an issue since the condensate just drips into the syrup tanks. It also may be degrading the Masonite board. I am using a top feeder with the inner cover and telescoping cover above. Should I be using the inner cover? Wouldn't the moisture just collect on the telescoping cover anyways? I am wondering if should ventilate the area between the actual syrup reservoirs and the top of the frames? I was thinking about drilling three to five 3/8" holes in in a line into the front of the feeder box itself. Is it wise to create a top entrance in this fashion?
 

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Humm! Always seems to be problems. :rolleyes::). What do you mean by degrading the inner cover? The masonite inner covers are more prone to warping than the 1/4 to 3/8 inch covers of plywood. Once it gets a belly, the bees propolize the hole area to the tele-cover. Turned the other way, it reduces bee space [>3/8"] on the center top bars.--[my experience.]

What are your nighttime temperatures in California? Does this prove that it doesn't take much in cool temperatures to create condensation moisture around feeders, with syrup? If you can, take a look under the feeder also. I don't think :scratch: the condensation will be as harmful as it would be in colder months.

You could try the holes. I would put fine screening on them to keep ants out and to discourage robbing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey Oldbee, Thanks for the help. By degrading I mean the Masonite is swelling and it also looks discolored (maybe mold?) I typically have been keeping the smooth side down. BTW, there is no notch in the frame my inner cover. Just the oval hole in the Masonite.
In the high desert we are still getting down into the low 40s at night and mid to high 70s during the day. Yep, 20* - 30* swings.
Actually I was thinking of creating an upper entrance. But if you are recommending screen there must be a concern related to robbing?
 

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If the bees can smell sugar syrup, they seem to investigate all the little holes or opportunities around the telecover that may not be defended by guard bees. This happens around here mostly in the fall when there is less of a nectar flow to keep everybody busy. In spring and summer, it may not be as bad. I am thinking about the 2-4 little holes that may not be guarded has much as the one main entrance and one or two others. I have holes in my boxes and open some of them in mid-summer during a strong nectar flow. I also prop the tele-cover with 1/4 inch or less wood shims for ventilation in the heat of our summer honey flow.
 

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I don't use the inner cover when I have the top feeder on, really isn't any reason for it.
Also I keep a Popsicle stick under the telescoping cover too let moist air out. We just have a little moisture collecting on the tele. cover.
 

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To have an inner cover without a notch in it makes no sense to me. You have no ventilation for moisture or for heat. They sell them with no notch because you can't put it back if you want a solid cover. The standard notch on the deep side of the cover provides very little ventilation but it it better than none at all, cut one in it. In snow country it doubles as an upper exit when the inner is placed with it's deep side down for the winter. In summer it vents the attic. The tele cover slid back will block it from other bees but still allow a bit of air movement.
When that massonite warps, usually, I put a small 3/8 inch piece of wood or stone to keep it away from the outer.
 

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A correction on what I said, With a top feeder where the bees can't get in the sugar area, there isn't a need for an inner cover.

Some top feeders have floats, & the bees do get in that area.
 
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