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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone used Mite-away II ? If so can you give me some detail on the sucess or lack of you had. Did you use it in the spring and fall? Did the Queen stop laying during treatment? I would like to hear from someone thats used it. Thanks for the info..................
 

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I have been using it since it was approved in 2005. The results have been very good, treatment is for 21 days. I apply it in Spring and Fall, I have not experienced any noticeable brood mortality or curtailment of egg laying by the queens. It also is an effective treatment for the forgotten Tracheal mite, which can still devastate a hive. studies have also shown it to be effective in destroying Nosema spores.
It’s considered a soft chemical that will not build up in comb or honey. Varroa cannot become resistant to it unlike hard chemicals like Checkmite. Because it physically damages the varroa. Canada and Europe were using it for 20 years before the US with good results.
I have found it to be an effective tool in my integrated pest management program.
 

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I too have used it several times and like it. I have seen hives with and w/o it and noticed a huge difference.
This product is very weather dependant. You need to follow the directions where the weather is concerned and the # of frames of bees. I believe it is minimum 5 frames of bees per box for treating...do not quote me, read the directions for yourself so you know what you are doing. The people at Nod Apiaries, the makers of the MA2 pads are great at answering product questions.
But again, I like and have good success with this product

One con to this product. If your infestation levels are high, MA2 is not your sole product. You will have to use another product to clean up the rest. Some thing like OA Yes it will knock them back, just not enough in a heavily infested hive. The average i believe is in the 80% kill rate for varroa. This is different than the hard chemicals where they tout a 90%+ kill rate. This information i got from our Apicurist (sp) department at the university.
 

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I've used it and have been pleased with the results. Like honeyshack mentioned, you probably shouldn't look at it as your only solution. As I've mentioned in the past, I personally believe that the best approach is multiple types of treatments over a period of time. Brent Bean mentioned that there didn't appear to be a slow down of egg laying. I thought that I did notice a slowing of production but I was also expecting it and, if there was a slowdown, it could have been from other reasons. If you do use it, please follow the directions carefully.
 

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I was going to use the MiteAway2 pads but I heard they're supposed to be coming out with a new product called MAQS Mite Away Quick Strip. I read about it in ABJ. I've been using Apiguard and like it, but it takes 21 days for a treatment. I think the treatment for the quick strip is 7 days.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the reply. I have used several other methods in the past. I plan on using the MA2 this spring. I have noticed a larger then normal mite problem in the past few weeks. I'm not sure if cold weather helps kill the mite or not but we are still having high 70's days here. As mentioned any feed good or bad would be helpful. I have done research on the product but nothing replaces peoples experince that have used it in the pass. The new strips that are comming out, when will the product be released? I have used checkmite in the past but to be honest I did not see any good results from it. THANKS EVERYONE FOR THE INFO.
 

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I use 1/2 of a treatement of apiguard in the spring because it doesn't warm up enough to get the full treatement on b/4 the honey flows. in the fall, I pull my honey and put on the second half of the apiguard treatement as it is always too warm for the mitewayII. then put on the mitewayII when temps get down the the range required. I can't remember the exact amount of time that a mitewayII treatement is good for, but since you get warmer earlier and stay warmer longer I would think you will have to treat at least twice with something. below is a response to a question that I had about mitewayII from the vendor.

Hi Mike;

below is a response I sent to Bee-L last Monday. For some reason it was not posted, even though I received the automated "received" notice.

Thanks for using MAII.
warm regards,
David v.


--- On Mon, 9/15/08, David Vander Dussen <[email protected]> wrote:

> Subject: Re: [BEE-L] mite-way II
> To: "Informed Discussion of Beekeeping Issues and Bee Biology" <[email protected]>
> Date: Monday, September 15, 2008, 9:18 AM
> Hi Mike;
>
> The MAII formula has not changed. Just a few comments:
>
> I am presuming that you have followed the label: bottom
> entrance fully open, inch and a half spacer rim on the brood
> chamber, MAII pad up on half inch sticks set on the top
> bars, holes are facing down, maximum hive size double brood
> chamber standard Langstroth supers, minimum colony size six
> full frames of bees for the cluster.
>
> I am also presuming that you treated in the spring so the
> varroa mites didn't get above threshold. If not, check
> out the "Save Your Bees" treatment program,
> available free by request off the website www.miteaway.com,
> for developing a treatment program.
>
> What you are seeing does not sound out of the ordinary for
> the start of a Mite-AwayII treatment, unless the bee loss is
> more than a couple of cups. Then other stresses are likely
> to be in play. Formic acid vapors are being used to kill
> mites, a living thing, and bees under stress can be
> impacted, especially if the varroa levels got above
> treatment threshold (3,200 mites). Are these mostly drones,
> workers, mite damaged brood/young bees being ejected, or a
> mix?
>
> For our registration we had to document effects to the
> environment. Vegetation browning within 6 to 8 inches of
> the entrance is normal. I'm surprised this wasn't
> noticed before. Usually the plants are not killed and will
> be putting up new top growth shortly.
>
> Every container of MAII has a production code number on it
> - look for the sticker between the pail ridges. The formic
> acid used to manufacture MAII is run in 26,000 kg batches,
> (57,320 lbs.) each batch is independently certified by an
> outside lab before it is brought on stream.
>
> From your email you treated on Wednesday, September 10th.
> Feed now for winter if you haven't yet, in a way that
> won't interfere with the MAII application (Miller
> feeder, through a lid feeder hole or inner cover with a
> pail, open barrel method, etc,). If there is any nectar
> flow on at the time the bees will ignore the feed but will
> get into it when the flow shuts off. Check the colony on
> October 10th. What you will see is clean hatching brood for
> the winter cluster, the queen will probably still be laying
> and you can look forward to healthy hives come spring.
>
> Treatment with MAII can look different from other treatment
> methods. Formic acid is a cleanser, killing bacteria. It
> is commonly used to de-stone medical equipment in a 10%
> concentration. It is also used agriculturally to preserve
> calf feed at room temperature for 3 to four days for demand
> feeding systems.
>
> Bees can take higher levels of formic vapor than the mites,
> both varroa and tracheal, which is why it can be used as a
> mite control product. MAII is the safest and most effective
> way to apply formic acid. There is often some initial brood
> loss as it says on the label, usually less than three days
> and just the youngest larva and eggs so there has been very
> little investment by the bees. This is one of the trade
> offs to get an effective treatment. The MAII chemistry was
> developed and many applications were tested before bringing
> MAII to the market place. The bottom line was that it had
> to work to control mites with minimum damage to the
> colonies, no residues in the hive or the honey. We are
> proud of the result.
>
> yours truly,
> David VanderDussen
> NOD Apiary Products
>
>
mike syracuse
 

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errr, a couple of thoughts:

1. i've never encontered the term "de-stone" (and i can't find a relevant definition online), but i assume it means "sterilize".

2. the proponents of formic acid treatments (including nod apiaries, who manufactures miteaway) tout as a beneficial side effect it's antibacterial qualities (it's anti microbial qualities are not limited to bacteria..many yeasts, fungi, etc are also affected). yet, we are becoming increasingly aware of the important function that microbes play in a healhty hive.

FA is devistating to the microbial culture in the hive, a culture that is important for honeybee health.

i suggest anyone interested in this stuff read this study from austrailia:
https://rirdc.infoservices.com.au/downloads/09-120.pdf

...and more background can be found in our paper:
http://BeeUntoOthers.com/NoBeeIsAnIsland.pdf

deknow
 

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I bought a tub of Mite-away-ll when I was given my hive this fall.
I assumed that because my hive had been in a field pretty much left on its own for 4 years that it would likely be in dire need of varroa mite treatments when I got it. The previous owner had used an occasional smear of Crisco with wintergreen oil in the hive, but I have no way of knowing whether that did anything or not.
Turns out there were very few mites in the hive and a local bk who went through the hive frame by frame with me said it looked quite healthy. I decided to not use the formic acid on them, following the 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it' method. Better Bee would not accept a return of the still-sealed, unopened tub within 30 days (simply because it was 'medication'...BUMMER), but I was lucky to find a local BK who uses it every year, and he bought it from me for a $6 discount.
Later I had a white tray under the screen board and only saw about a dozen mites per week on the tray, which I figured was not enough to worry about.
No deformed wings could be seen on any dead bees outside the hive either.

After talking to quite a few local beekeepers around my area, I've found there are several who have not been treating at all for mites for years now and who have low mite counts and are not having mite problems. I am going to emulate their methods.
 

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Seeing DWV is not necessarily a death sentence. I've seen colonies that looked pretty bad with it and do well the next year without any treatments.
 

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I used Mite-Away II for the first time this fall. I'm a big fan of soft and organic treatments and have declined to use Apistan or Check-mite in favor of other, more "natural" approaches.

When I used the Mite-Away II pads, I had a pair of protective gloves, but declined to buy a respirator. In Canada (which is NOT where I live) a respirator is not required, but in the USA (yeah, I'm somewhere in their jurisdiction) a respirator with specific organic fume filters is required.

I declined, but always stood on the upwind side and never felt the compulsion to breathe deeply around the pads. I had no problem, but the fumes are nasty if you catch a whiff.

One detriment to trying to use this treatment was the exceptionally warm temps we had this fall. I had to wait until the temps dropped below 80 degrees. I also had to close off my SBBs. I cannot say anything about brood kill as most of my queens were shutting down anyway.

One HUGE benefit I noticed was the absence of SHBs after I pulled the pads. Despite a host of trapping options for the SHBs during the summer, I still had plenty of the adult beetles in the hive when the pads went on. Mite-Away II has eliminated them. I am very impressed.

I'm looking forward to the MAQS as they don't require the same temp requirements.

Grant
Jackson, MO
 

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I have also noticed a decrease in bear activity with the MA2 pads. We had a bear get into the hives this past fall (someone--me--forgot to turn the fencer on)
He had two hives that he got into out of 20. Those two, he stopped at pulling the pad off one and knocking the other over. I think he would have had a field day in the yard had the pads not been on. JMO
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Dont have a bear problem, but we do have wild hogs. They dont want to eat the brood or honey, they lean against the hives to scratch and knock them over. I have had to deal with this a few times. Our feral hog popualtion is sky high.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have read the pro and cons on chemical mite control. I wish I could never place anything but Bees, wood and wax in the hive. But for every action their is an equal and oposite reaction. Kill the Mites Kill microbial culture in the hive or contaminate wax. I can't argue for or aginst, other then without it I would not have bees. I'm sure I will get beat up about saying that. I have read many ideas on natural mite control and tried several of the ideas. Yes it helps some. But my family does depend on this small amount of yearly income. We only run 150 hives but are able to sale all our honey at good prices not in bulk. It's a slower return and alot of work going to festival and public events but it works for us. Sorry for the long winded soap box reply and getting off the subject I first posted. Someone kinda ruffled my feathers in a private email about how bad it was to chemical treat my hives. I wish shut up now....
 
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