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Discussion Starter #1
After four winters of replacing some or all of my bees I’ve decided I am going to mimic Mike’s style of raising bees as he lives in a climate similar to mine. My question is I’ve noticed all of his colonies sit on the ground I believe on a 2x4 base while I have mine sitting on a elevated stand. Now I realize he runs a lot more colonies than I do and would be a lot more work to sit his hives on stands. But by his hives buried in the snow is there some kind of insulation by the snow that helps with his overwintering?
 

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Yes, snow helps insulate. But, it's not only about a low stand, or a hive configuration. It's also about the bees. What are you replacing the deadouts with. Proven stock that winters well in the north, or....And are you feeding them if they need it, early enough so they ripen it? And, are you keeping the varroa load down below treatment threshold? It all matters.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes, snow helps insulate. But, it's not only about a low stand, or a hive configuration. It's also about the bees. What are you replacing the deadouts with. Proven stock that winters well in the north, or....And are you feeding them if they need it, early enough so they ripen it? And, are you keeping the varroa load down below treatment threshold? It all matters.
Mike,
I hate to admit it but my replacements in the past has been with those southern packages. I couldn’t find the stock I wanted around my area, so I ordered some queens from you that I will have this July. Also this year I will be weighing and getting hives that are light fed in August. I had been using OAV for treatments and not doing mite counts, no more will be doing mite counts this year and using Apivar as you recommend on one of your videos
 
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