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I'm interested in having a close look at my bees - to check for everything from mites to age i.e. wear and tear (aging of the bees) how powerful a microscope will I need? Thanks. c
 

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I'm interested in having a close look at my bees - to check for everything from mites to age i.e. wear and tear (aging of the bees) how powerful a microscope will I need? Thanks. c
I am in the middle of assessing this right now for a project. What I have learned (total microscope novice here) is that one scope does not do all tasks. A compound microscope will let you look at nosema and pollen samples- need pretty strong zoom and a dissecting or stereo microscope will let you look up close at bees. NY Bee Wellness has some stuff on microscopes. http://nybeewellness.com/Microscopy___Anatomy.html
http://www.Microscope.com has a "beekeeper special" (compound).

IMHO, microscopy is clearly an area that the US could use a lot more organized information on. UK has a microscopy certificate program and training well established.
here are some UK links
http://www.bbka.org.uk/files/library/27-10-2011_microscopy_2012_1319745954.pdf

http://www.brunelmicroscopes.co.uk/bee-disease.html
 

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I believe Randy Oliver did a very detailed piece on nosema with the microscope , I'm sure you will find it if you search his site , very interesting .
 

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A dissection microscope will do the trick.

The total magnification is usually just the objective magnification X the eyepiece magnification.

What you should also look for in a good dissection scope is the field of view.

For looking at a bee up close, 30X or so is more than enough, otherwise it can be difficult to keep the specimen in the field.

Nowadays, some folks prefer to use LED illumination since it's often more convenient to use the scope without worrying about power cords, etc. .

PS-some also come with USB cameras.
 

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A dissection microscope will do the trick.
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Absolutely not. Nosema detection requires 400x.
Tracheal mites can be seen at 30x, but are much more easily understood at 100x.

WLC is correct *(see below) that for general inspection a dissecting scope (typically 30x binocular is fine)
 

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"I'm interested in having a close look at my bees - to check for everything from mites to age i.e. wear and tear (aging of the bees) how powerful a microscope will I need? Thanks. c "

The OP wants to examine at the 'morphology' level.

30X is fine, and he needs a dissection scope.

JW, with a USB camera that slips into an eyepiece, it can often digitally increase the magnification to well above 30X so that it is easier to look at dissected insects parts and even tracheal tubes.

What the OP will also need are the appropriate tools to do dissections though.
 

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To see tracheal mites you need a microscope, but just to look closely at the bees' aging (and to see varroa mites on them or the sticky board) a good hand lens is a cheap and convenient tool to have in your bee tool kit. I am always surprised when people say they can't see eggs, or count varroa on sticky boards because of vision issues. The solution doesn't even cost ten bucks; even though a good hand lens of slightly higher power is better, the kind you can buy at Staples does the trick and you won't be fussed if it gets lost or broken in the field.
 

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Clairmont, for what you are wanting to look at the dissecting scope would be perfect.

Also, if you have bad eye site like me, you can use the dissecting scope for queen grafting. My eyes aren't like used to be, and a magnifying glass isn't strong enough for me. :D

I bought a used one off craigslist for $100. Owner didn't know the quality of the scope he had.
 

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I use a common garden variety B&L stereo scope with 15x eyepieces and 0.7 to 3x zoom (10.5-45x), top lighted; it serves all of my needs very well. Since I haven't had a need to get to cellular levels, my lab microscope remains in its case.
 

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Microscopes are useful in many ways such as medical, scientific, biological, and industrial research. You can buy the microscopes according to your requirements.

Check this website and you can find the ones that you like to buy [Link removed by moderator]
 
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