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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our Chat with Michael Bush - Treatment Free Beekeeping

Michael-Bush-300x300.jpg

We are happy this week to present the interview with Michael Bush. Michael is a well-known treatment free beekeeper from Nebraska. He is renowned for his common sense and practical approach to keeping bees.

Here is what you will find out from Michael:-

  • What is Michael's biggest challenge in keeping his bees alive in Nebraska?
  • Sometimes the answer is to do nothing
  • Feeding can set off a Robbing Frenzy
  • How to get more honey in a Top Bar Hive
  • How to get started in Treatment Free Beekeeping
  • 45 Degrees is the best angle for Foundation Less Frames
  • The Hopkins Method of Queen Rearing was popularised by Isaac Hopkins (A New Zealander)
  • What was the motivation for Michael Bush's Book?

Press the play button on the page in the following link-
Michael Bush - Treatment Free Beekeeping

You will also find the "kiwimana" podcast on itunes and stitcher Radio, you can listen to podcasts on your mobile phone.

Hope you enjoy the chat...Gary
 

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"45 degrees"... I may be wrong but I think it is the angle of the sides of the downward hanging strip for the bees to build come from? This creates a "point" for the bees to cluster from and began their wax building.
Oh ok. That's called the "comb guide". :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Can you please elaborate on "45 Degrees is the best angle for Foundation Less Frames"?
Hi Justin,

Yes its the angle of wooden strip that is stuck below the Top Bar on a normal hoffman style frame. Michael found he didn't get any better foundation building when he increased this to greater than 45 degrees. Have a listen to that part of the show, think he explains it pretty well.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes he's referring to the comb guide. You can find it on his site here
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoundationless.htm
Thanks for posting that, I will try and add it to the show notes. I am keen to try this on a few hives next spring (We are in New Zealand), looking forward to seeing what the bees create.

Has anyone tried an entire box of foundation-less hives with the comb guides, did you get crazy comb?

Gary
 

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Thanks for posting that, I will try and add it to the show notes. I am keen to try this on a few hives next spring (We are in New Zealand), looking forward to seeing what the bees create.

Has anyone tried an entire box of foundation-less hives with the comb guides, did you get crazy comb?

Gary
I started 18 packages foundationless few years back. Only got 1 box where the comb was across all frames. I started moving it up and eventually ( after winter ) was able to remove it from the hive. I saved it and use it for workshops/presentations.
Occasionally, the bees will curve the comb across 2 or 3 frames, but that mainly happens in honey boxes. 98% of the brood comb is pretty straight. The rest can be fixed and made workable, but rubber bands have become a part of my beekeeping toolbag.
 

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Marcin,

Did you use the comb guide strip of wood for your frames? Or just used the top bar in normal frames?

Cheers...Gary
In that case, I was using wedge top bars with the wedge turned 90 degrees to it's intended position thus creating a guide.
 
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