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What do you melt wax in to coat permacomb? How many lbs of wax do you start off with? Is the pot big enough to shake the wax back into the pot? Just how do you do it to keep cells from filling in. Youre recipe I'm going to save to my favorites
 

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>What do you melt wax in to coat permacomb?

I have an electric turkey roaster. I'd like something larger.

>How many lbs of wax do you start off with?

Enough to mostly fill the roaster. I'd guess it's 10 or 15 pounds, but I really have no real idea.

>Is the pot big enough to shake the wax back into the pot?

Yes. But I also hit the comb on the table to knock more out. Makes a real mess.

>Just how do you do it to keep cells from filling in.

You HAVE to preheat the PermaComb to 200 degress or the wax will just stop up the cells. It has to be hot enough that the wax will run off.
 

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I have to add my .02 cents. Michael said in a previous thread that it must be a gas oven to warm the PC to 200 degrees. I'll let him explain why.

Pugs
 

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Perhaps you can spray it on with a pump, or bottle sprayer??
Konrad
 

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Since I don't have a gas oven, would it be ok to preheat the oven to around 200 degrees then put the PC frames in there for a few mins. before I dip/spray on the wax?
 

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I don't think spraying will work at all. The wax will cool while passing through the air.

The problem with even the gas oven is that if any part of the oven or the radiant heat gets over 220 F the PermaComb will melt. (I have a ruined one to prove it). Electric ovens tend to have a lot of radiant heat that is hotter than the air temperature in the oven. Since I end up leaving them in the oven for 10 to 15 minutes I don't know how preheating and then putting it in would work.

I should also say, if you value your marriage (and if you have one) I would NOT do it in your kitchen. I have an outdoor oven. I suppose you could heat them in the house and run them outside, but shaking out the wax is EXTREMELY messy. I have a set of clothes and boots I just wear for doing that.
 

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Here is an unproven variant of the MB method of wax-coating PermaComb.
I floated about 4 inches of wax on water in a pot about 12 inches deep and put that on the stove to heat. When the was is well melted, I dipped the PermaComb in 1/2 a sheet at a time, giving it time to heat up so the wax would flow back out nicely.
The result looks good to me, but I have not given these to the bees yet to see if there is any problem.
 

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Sheet? Not a word I would use to describe PermaComb. More like a comb than a sheet. In fact EXACTLY like a comb.

I have considered the possibility that you could leave it in the wax until it warmed up, but it was time consuming enough heating them 12 at a time in the oven without waiting the same period of time for each comb. It would be a useful experiment, however, because it might be worth making a tank that would hold about 20 of them at a time and wait for the wax to heat them enough.

>I bet those boots are waterproof!

They would be if it weren't for the holes that were in them before I started waxing PermaComb.
they were my "retired" boots.
 

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Sheet was a poor word choice. John calls them frames, so let's go with that.

It didn't take long for the frame of permacomb to heat up in the wax/water.

I did this in my kitchen, and it was only a little messy, and not a big deal. But, I was only doing 20 frames.
 

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Good information with one other thing I'd like to add in case someone who is new should read this. Many a home, honey house and garage have been burnt to a cinder due to overheating wax or heating it over an open flame. If you've never had the opportunity to watch wax burst into flame at the flash point it looks and acts allot like gasoline. Set your operation up outside or make sure you have the fire fighting equipment to deal with a flash fire. All it takes is the phone to ring and poof! Michael is right about an outside set-up and work clothes. If you take heating wax lightly you can be assured something will happen to change that opinion in a hurry!
 

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I agree on the safety issues.

My wax is in an electric roaster with a built in double boiler with water in it and a thermostat built in to the roaster. No flames. The plastic is being heated in a gas oven (outside) and the whole process is done outside. I think this is the best, safest and most likely to not burn down your house and most likely to keep your marriage.
 
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