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I’ve had hives for about three years and this has never happened before. I have a dozen hives wintering on their stands (4x4 on cinder blocks, about 15” from the ground). I have found at least 4 mouse nests on top of the screened bottom board inserts when I checked before an OAV treatment. The mice are living UNDER the screen, but on top of the insert. I keep the insert in for the winter (mid Atlantic area). A mouse guard won’t help this at all. Any ideas for what to do beyond removing the insert every day to “evict” the residents?
 

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How are they getting in?

If they can't get in, they won't be nesting.

What is your entrance configuration? No mouse guards?

Although I dont think this is an entrance issue, because you say the mice are below the screen and above the sticky board?

I don't know what the rest of your configuration is, but a screen board in winter would not be my choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How are they getting in?

If they can't get in, they won't be nesting.

I don't know what the rest of your configuration is, but a screen board in winter would not be my choice.
They are getting in from underneath and living on top of the slide in insert, but underneath the screened portion. So they aren’t IN the hive, but BENEATH it. They are attracted to the warmth and dropped detritus, I’m sure. I cannot completely seal the insert area, since a mouse can squeeze through super tiny cracks. I use the insert to check hive health in the winter (where is the cluster, are mites or other pests dropping down, etc). It’s annoying.
 

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They are getting in from underneath and living on top of the slide in insert, but underneath the screened portion. So they aren’t IN the hive, but BENEATH it. They are attracted to the warmth and dropped detritus, I’m sure. I cannot completely seal the insert area, since a mouse can squeeze through super tiny cracks. I use the insert to check hive health in the winter (where is the cluster, are mites or other pests dropping down, etc). It’s annoying.
I use my hive tool wedge a rag in the slot where you insert the your board. Same way I set up the bottom board for oaving.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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they are eating the bees that drop.
either find a way to keep them out or put some mouse traps near the hives.

A cat?

Can you set the Bottom board on a piece of plywood to close up the bottom?
tin,
political sign
any thing to prevent the mice from access.

GG

BTW I hate mice if I had 2 bucks for every comb messed with by mice.....
 

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Shim the slide out board so it is flush with the bottom board itself at the back, just stick anything under there to keep upward pressure on it.
Or go to Amazon and order " Just one bite" It truly works. It's a poison made with peanut butter and just put where the bigger critters can't get to it. We used it for years around around the feed storage areas for our pastured pigs.
 

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Place a couple peanut butter baited mouse traps out next to the hives. Once you trap them all, thumbtack or fold hardware cloth over the opening.
This is better than poison. It's quick and clean, unlike bromadiolone, which causes the animal to slowly bleed to death over several days. Since it does take days to kill the bait animal, these poison-filled rodents still circulate in the environment where they can be eaten by dogs, cats, snakes, fox, owls, etc., which end up poisoned as well, suffering the same fate.

I use traps styled like this. IMO they're the one design that's truly a better mousetrap.
 

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It’s unlikely there will be secondary poisoning due to rodenticides as rarely the rodent receives a lethal dose the first feeding and by the time they do the product is mostly metabolized. I’m not advocating their use in this situation as it takes a few months to achieve rodent control with rodenticides just saying that secondary poisonings are vastly over blown
 

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If it was me and mine I'd just remove the board insert and let the mice fall to the ground and smash/feed them to the chickens. Replace the board after a few days if you want.

We're in Northern Wisconsin, and when we began keeping bees over 20 years ago, all hives spent the entire winter with their SBB wide open. Losses (10-30%) were always acceptable....until varroa invaded our bee yard :(
 

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They are getting in from underneath and living on top of the slide in insert, but underneath the screened portion. So they aren’t IN the hive, but BENEATH it.
You are going to have to sure up the slide somehow as suggested, and I can assure you that it is very likely they are also entering the hives when the bees are clustered if you don't have mouse guards on "living/housing" that close to an open entrance?
 

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I had this problem with Lyson bottom board inserts. It’s aggravating. Best solution is to stuff a rag in the back between the tray and the hive body. I’ve also used duct tape in the winter with success.
 

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Frostproof Florida
I’ve had hives for about three years and this has never happened before. I have a dozen hives wintering on their stands (4x4 on cinder blocks, about 15” from the ground). I have found at least 4 mouse nests on top of the screened bottom board inserts when I checked before an OAV treatment. The mice are living UNDER the screen, but on top of the insert. I keep the insert in for the winter (mid Atlantic area). A mouse guard won’t help this at all. Any ideas for what to do beyond removing the insert every day to “evict” the residents?
If they are between the screen and cover board inserts then they are not getting in to the hive and causing problems just leave them alone. they want to be warm, if you evict them then they might get into the hive and eat holes in your combs and destroy your frames
 

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If they are between the screen and cover board inserts then they are not getting in to the hive and causing problems just leave them alone. they want to be warm, if you evict them then they might get into the hive and eat holes in your combs and destroy your frames
the tend to pee on anything under them.
And it time they chew and may find a way in.

Kill then as soon as you can, you will thank your self

GG
 
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