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Discussion Starter #1
The main difference i see between these two types of queen excluders is that the wooden bound one gives the bees more room in between the grate and the frames. Plus, I think they look better. Anyone have any opinion on if the extra room is better for the bees, or does it not make any difference?
 

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I have wooden bound ones.

Having them for a 2 years now the one disadvantage that I have found with the wooden bound ones is they are harder to clean because you can not burn them clean as easily (compared to unbound metal ones).

I would take metal screens (wood bound or not) over plastic because metal is easier to clean when the bees decide to build burr comb all over it.

There is a lot of debate if queen excluders help or not with getting honey into the supers, and I am sure someone will respond with their opinion on that. I used one the first year and didn't the second year. I do not have enough experience to say if they help or hurt with getting the supers filled yet.

I would still keep a few around. I found them useful when I was trying to chase off a drone only laying queen and could not find her. I eventually shook the entire hive thru a queen excluder until I had her quarantined whit a small ball of bees.
 

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Advantages to wood bound excluders:
1) you can see that there is an excluder so you remember to remove it.
2) you can notch it to make a drone escape
3) it maintains better bee space so if they do connect it in some way, it's with wax instead of propolis.
 

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The disadvantage to the wooden bound excluders is the space in the wooden rim where the metal enters, great place for shb to hide. I used a little caulk to fill in the space, not exactly pretty but frustrates the shb.
 

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Switched to metal bound after using the wood bound for years. I see no difference in their effectiveness. Much less burr comb and they clean up easily in a solar melter. No wooden rims to rot, repair or replace.
 

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The wood-bound ones I have (used only for queen-rearing) do upset the vertical spacing, so there's a fair amount of wax attachments made onto the wires. The flat, punched-sheet zinc excluders from yesteryear don't have the same spacing problem, but they aren't very 'wing-friendly'. I do have one 100% plastic excluder (without spacing problems) which I use solely for separating bees, but would never install it - as I can't figure out how those are cleaned ...
LJ
 

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Metal, lasts years beyond wood bound.
Boil them in a fifty gallon drum that we cut in half.
Could never understand why folks use plastic.
How do you clean them? Maybe just buy new each year.
 

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They all work. My antique wood bound require very gentle handling. The one piece plastic are tough and easy. The plastic ones work just as well but don't last as long.
 

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FWIW, there's another kind of excluder which many folks don't know about - the plywood excluder: http://www.dave-cushman.net/bee/excludertypes.html (second graphic up from the bottom of that page).

I've made one and used it, and it works extremely well. Not sure I'd ever trust it to keep two queens apart, but for just keeping the queen from laying in a particular box - it works great. Don't knock the idea until you've tried it ... :)
LJ
 

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Discussion Starter #13
My thought is that the bees have more room with the wooden bound frame, making it easier for them to find a good spot to go through.
 

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I have both and I'm slowly weeding out the wood bound. Why?
The amount of "ladder comb" they build in the wood excluder is ALOT the way I run honey boxes. You see, I use a top entrance above my excluder for the field bees. I take the frame to an inner cover and cut the air vent to 4-5 inches wide. The field bees eventually use it exclusively for coming and going. The wood framed excluder combined with the upper entrance makes the gap between brood chamber and honey supers just too talk. Way too much honey is eventually stored in the "ladder comb" they build on top of the excluder to the bottom of the first honey super. I can try to make slat in the wood framed excluder for a top entrance. Just never works well. I do realize that my situation is unique.
Still, if I didn't have the top entrance, I would still choose the solid metal excluders.
 

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I use metal and am pleased with them, I get minimal build up on them and find them easy to clean. I may purchase one wooden framed excluder just to screw to the bottom of a box to be used as a shaker box.
 

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Wood framed. If you keep them clean, for us they stick less than the all metal ones. And yes, you need a setup to melt the wax out of a stack of them at a time.

Crazy Roland
 

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Oh I hate those plastic, but they are 1/3 the price and got me out of a pinch. I’ve now invested into enough metal bound that the plastic is just by overflow.
It’s the twisting on the excluder use that breaks the wood frames. If the crew were to be less careless, they would last but after a while of pulling honey my equipment gets tested. Metal bound is a solid investment. Your resale value will be there as long as there are beekeepers
 

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I’ve been using metal excluders when I do use them...the idea of using plastic and knowing that it won’t last as long as the metal ones and can potentially end up in the ocean or some where else that would hamper an ecosystem bums me out.
 

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FWIW, there's another kind of excluder which many folks don't know about - the plywood excluder: http://www.dave-cushman.net/bee/excludertypes.html (second graphic up from the bottom of that page).

I've made one and used it, and it works extremely well. Not sure I'd ever trust it to keep two queens apart, but for just keeping the queen from laying in a particular box - it works great. Don't knock the idea until you've tried it ... :)
LJ
so this just uses the idea that a queen does not go to the outer frames? cause she can fit through a half inch hole. i've seen plenty of queens roaming around on the outer frames.
 
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