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How much honey would you expect from one medium super?I just extracted 16 frames and got a little over five gallons is this just about right.This is my first real honey crop since I got bees about four years ago.
 

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I should go a little more in detail.I put five medium supers on my one good hive they filled three and had necture in the fourth.Only two where capped enough to process and I didn't do two of the frames because they were not capped.I probobly could take the third one off in a week or so before sourwood comes in.
 

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Three gallon per medium super correct? Not 3 gallon per 16 frames.
 

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Thanks John
 

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All I can tell you, is what I have got in the past. I use to use 1 quart mason jars, exclusively, and found that one medium super generally filled 12 quart jars, if fully capped. I used 9 frames per super.
 

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A medium depth super, aka 6 5/8 inch super, can yeild 45 lbs of honey. Perhaps the rest of you are running 5 11/16 inch supers?

Did the op author run 9 frames? One seems to get more honey out of a super w/ 9 frames. The bees often leave the outside s of the outside combs empty when they have ten frames in the boxes.

A good deep will yield as much as 60 lbs of honey.
A shallow, or 5 11/16 will yield 25 to 30.
 

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I'm not saying you can't get 45 pounds of honey, but that would be almost 4 gallons of honey. Maybe the honey here in Southeast Texas is not as dense as the honey in New York? 3 gallons is 36 lbs, at 12 lbs per gallon. Then again, maybe the 3 gallons per medium super is just an average, that I remember.
 

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A medium depth super, aka 6 5/8 inch super, can yeild 45 lbs of honey. A good deep will yield as much as 60 lbs of honey.
Middle of May, in Texas, I pulled 4 mediums, and 1 deep almost all completely sealed honey. After deducting the weight of the 5 gal. buckets, my honey weighed 225 pounds.

That would be 45#x4=180# for mediums; 60x1=60# for the deep for a total of 240#. Although, all the frames were sealed, not all were completely drawn as I started with empty plastic frames. Also there were a several deep frames that were the honey super cell [manufactured drawn plastic cells], which were sealed but not drawn beyond the plastic. These were not completely uncapped and I returned these only partially extracted to the colony with about 1/2 of the honey left in them.

I agree with sqkcrk on this one. During the 70's and 80's, when I kept bees, a deep would yield 5 gal. [or 60pounds] and a medium would yield 3 gal.+2 quarts+1 1/2 pints [or about 44.25 pounds].

Danny
 

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OK. I just started back keeping bees last year. I kept bees in the late 70's, thru the late 80's, and I was getting 3 gallons per medium super of 9 frames. So, why the increase now? I plan to rob in a couple of weeks, and will be able to tell how now compares to then.
 

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I run all my honey supers with only 8 frames. Bees can put more honey in 8 then 10. Avg. medium super 40-50lb, using 8 frames instead of 10. I've had shallow 10 frame cut comb super weigh out at 28 lbs. of honey. Those are some really nice boxes of comb honey.:thumbsup:
 
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