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I have been using medium supers throughout my hives. I consider the bottom three the hive bodies/brood area. A lot of bee keepers use the deeps for the brood chambers. Three medium supers is almost the same size as two deeps. As far as number of bees for honey production - has anyone seen any difference between running brood boxes of two deeps versus three medium supers?
 

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it seems that many of the experts are recommending 8 frame mediums. the commercial folks use mostly 10 frame deeps. the cost per square foot of comb is lower for deeps. the deeps cut back on the time it takes to inspect each hive. the deeps have less gaps between boxes, this may be helpful to the bees especially in cold climates and will cut back on burr comb between boxes again a little less labor. it is your choice..i like 10 frame deeps.
 

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I have been using medium supers throughout my hives. I consider the bottom three the hive bodies/brood area. A lot of bee keepers use the deeps for the brood chambers. Three medium supers is almost the same size as two deeps. As far as number of bees for honey production - has anyone seen any difference between running brood boxes of two deeps versus three medium supers?
I went deeps, until I grabbed my first full deep at chest height.... Now the deeps I do have are bottom brood chambers and will eventually be fazed out.
Everthing is Mediums from now on. Bottom three meds are brood, everthing above that is a super. You need to find out what a full deep is like at chest height BEFORE you have a yard full of deeps. I wish I had listened to Mr. Bush right out of the gate, but I let my macho ego get in the way of my good sense...
 

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I ran two deeps for brood for about 29 years. I ran ten frame mediums for everything for a year or two and then eight frame mediums for the last 10 years or so (some overlap while converting). Bees don't care what size box they are in. There are difference, such as having more ability to control the space (adding one box isn't such a sudden change) and not having to lift heavy boxes.
 

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I tried mediums last year for the sake of swapping frames through everything. From that year, I think I would have stayed with 10 deeps for hive bodies and kept the mediums for supers. I am thinking about running deeps for them to draw out as supers. I would like to have some more drawn comb of deeps. Heavy yes, but helpful for my yard, yes. Running deeps as hive bodies also cuts back on the number of parts you need. Less boxes, frames, etc. I also like the idea of them only having two boxes to go between in the Winter.
>As far as number of bees for honey production - has anyone seen any difference between running brood boxes of two deeps versus three medium supers?

Number of bees.. the amount of comb would be about the same which means, egg laying is about the same..which means honey production is about the same. The area of egg laying has no direct effect on honey production just numbers and strength of you bees. juzzer
 

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I went from deeps to mediums. All 10 frames. Sure, I sometimes end up with a deep or two if I'm picking up a deep nuc but that's about it. The only real difference I have is it takes a bit more time to get into the bottom box once the colony is established. And, you have to make a few more frames but that was about it for me.
 

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I beg to differ with my fellow cheesehead who wrote:

The area of egg laying has no direct effect on honey production just numbers and strength of you bees.

But the number and strength of your bees DOES have an effect on honey production. The more field bees, the more surplus. Keep as much open area in front of the queen as you can.

We use a single deep for brood, and deeps for supers. The reasons are purely economical. Anything else is either a waste of time or money. If you are not in this to make the most honey you can, for the least amount of money, it really does not matter what you use.

Crazy Roland
 

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I'm sort of with Roland on this one. I plan to use DEEP frame equipment for everything for ease of use, and when I start making NUC's to sell it'll be a lot easier to deal with only one type of equipment. But as everyone points out about the weight, yes heavy. But as many are doing using just 1 type of equipment is WAY easier than mutiple.
 

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Wanted to start with all mediums...it only made sense that eventually I would reach a point where I couldn't lift a deep. Unfortunately had to start with a nuc because I wanted a jumpstart, and nucs only come with deep frames.
 

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In my opinion the bees look at the top bars as a honey cap and are more prone to swarming with so many bars to cross.
 

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I wintered a half dozen colonies in three medium brood boxes to see if I liked it better than two deeps. I think I am done with it. Way too many frames to handle. It is also more expensive in equipment. When I get too old to throw deeps which at going on 64 may come fast, I may have to reconsider.
 

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I am a hobbiest, so maximizing honey production and efficiency are not my primary goals. Plus, I crushed a disc in my lower back years ago and look to save weight when lifting where ever I can. I went with all 8-frame mediums for weight savings and unlimited swap-ability. Going on my third year, I am very happy with using all mediums.

The unlimited swap-ability is especially convenient. I can't imagine having two different sizes of boxes and frames to inventory and organize.

During swarm season, since I have lots of mediums around to be used for honey, I always have some boxes and frames to hive swarms in which is compatible with the rest of my brood chamber equipment.

For myself, having the brood chamber divided in three smaller sections instead of two larger ones makes brood nest inspections, and finding the queen, when necessary, easier.

I run unlimited brood chambers, and by using mediums I can better "fine-tune" the brood chamber size for overwintering, where a smaller cluster only has to heat 2 mediums rather than 2 deeps.

The only thing I am re-considering is the 8-frame vs. 10-frame decision. A booming 8-frame hive can get pretty tall. If I do go to 10-frame equipment, I will be even happier that I run all mediums for weight reasons.
 

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I beg to differ with my fellow cheesehead who wrote:

The area of egg laying has no direct effect on honey production just numbers and strength of you bees.

Crazy Roland
But it seems you do agree with me. IMO, the area of space to lay has no DIRECT affect on honey production but it has ALL to do with building up numbers of bees more, which in turn, results in more honey production.DIRECTLY VS. INDIRECTLY. Eggs and larvae have no control over honey production. It is when they become bees and go forage to gather nectar to increase honey production. Open cells=more egg laying area=more bees=more foraging=more honey. So yes surface area will make a difference. 2 deeps to 3 mediums won't make much of a difference.

I broke down the question to what was specifically be asked, but assumed what was implied. juzzer (correct me if I am still missing the boat here.) GO CHEESEHEADS

My question is, do you think the bees or more importantly, the Queen, dislikes having the extra space created between boxes when 3 mediums are used versus 2 deeps? Not much, just 1 more "layer." Someone mentioned the Queen would prefer to NOT walk on the woodenware versus comb. It makes sense to me.
 

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To answer that question, ask ODfrank, who uses jumbo frames(I think). He may tell you they like Jumbos even better, no breaks.

OK, I missed the direct/indirect part(blame it on the lack of beer). Yes, the more adult bees, the more honey potential. The less open brood, the more honey potential, in the short run(is that a direct result?).

Crazy Roland
 

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> A booming 8-frame hive can get pretty tall.

That's why my stands are 3 1/2" tall and my hives are up against each other. The 3 1/2" gets them down about one box worth lower than being on concrete blocks and the "up against each other" keeps them from blowing over in the wind. The top entrances make up for the lower hives as far as skunks and grass blocking the entrance.
 
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