Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,833 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While looking for mushrooms in the days past and finding patches of linden trees etc, a very interesting observation occurred. There are no acorns, crabapples, chestnuts. We had a late Spring frost this year.
Now I feel that this is one of the major reasons for my drastic reduction in honey production this year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
No flowers, no fruits, no honey? I believe for acorns is a cycle of about 4 years between heavy crops. This could apply to other trees. Is there a similar related cycle in honey production, not taking into consideration floods, storms a.s.o.?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,078 Posts
Sounds to me like all the plants you mention are very early bloomers. What was the rest of the season like? In my area these are all buildup forage, the main honey plants don't start to blossom until May and June.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
We have a very heavy mast crop here this year, but we had a very poor honey season. I blame it on the never ending rain we got this spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Great basswood seed production here this year...got a couple baggies full without trying...gonna try to drag a strip for them down back and sow me a little nursery bed.

Basswood flow wasn't bad here either.

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
764 Posts
I am with Dwight about the endless thundere boomers in June and July.There records broken here for rain both months.If there was dry weather it was between the blooms.then just when the basswoods were in full bloom 5 days of rain.Was a strange year to say the least here.Spring started out great the hive built up great ealy on then cam a late cool snap and rain,rain and more rain.I was 200lbs short on honey from last year with 40% more hives.Hope to be swimming in honey next season
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
918 Posts
I wouldn't consider my chestnut trees early bloomers and I've got a great crop of them coming off of my dozen trees right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,604 Posts
I have another thought on one possible factor for reduced honey production this year, which has pounded every beekeeper in my region.

We had a very mild winter and the bee populations in late winter and early spring were exploding. Then came day after day of rain during the early flow, followed by a record number of swarms this past spring. Every beekeeper I have talked to had all of their hives swarm this spring... some of them more than once, including me.

Now picture every apiary in a region suddenly doubling their hives and number of bees foraging in the same region. That is pretty much what happened after all of this springs' swarming.

Could it be that there was too sudden of an increase in colonies with all of the new swarm feral hives and then not enough nectar to fulfill all of their requirements?

Plus with the mild winter I noticed that there has been an increased number of other insects which are feeding on nectar.

I spoke last week with a local beekeeper who does removals from homes and structures and he said that the past dozen or so he has removed have had no stores at all... so there is a high probability that most of the feral swarms from this past spring are not going to make it through the winter. This could change the dynamics for next spring with our managed hives. We'll see.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top