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Discussion Starter #1
OK, I know these are sort of silly questions and opinions will vary widely but I would love your opinions.

What is the maximum amount of honey that a package stated on drawn comb at the end of March could produce in Massachusetts?

What is the maximum amount of honey that a package stated on drawn comb mid April could produce in Massachusetts?


I bet we will all agree that the least amount would be zero!
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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The most they will make will be 200 pounds. The least will be they eat 100 pounds of sugar syrup and make nothing. In between they may die and produce nothing...

What are they likely to make? Probably just enough to get through the winter.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesexpectations.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I really like that answer and it points up my error in thinking zero was the worst cast. Eating 100 lbs of sugar, and producing nothing AND dying is certainly worse.

Makes me realize even worse outcomes. eg.
robbing out another hive, getting treatments, eating lots of sugar, stinging you on the nose while driving and causing you to wreak your truck, producing no honey and on an on....

I guess it can always be a lot worse than no honey!
 

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:) IF you are lucky "Probably just enough to get through the winter." This is Massachusetts. Why not start with a nuc and then you probably will succeed in your quest for sufficient honey to harvest starting in either month. OMTCW
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I had such good luck with packages in 2008 and such terrible luck with nucs in 2010 that I am going back to packages this year.

I know, I know, the weather last year was most definitely a problem One personal factor also is that moving around a bunch of packages is way easier on the back than lifting and hauling those nuc boxes.

But you've got me thinking and I think i will may add a nuc or two to my package order and hedge.

I have to admit that I like to know where my (I mean my bees) comb had been also.

I know I shouldn't be in such a honey greedy mode but should have the goal of keeping the bees alive and healthy. Too cold to go out and too much time to ponder I guess.
 

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teebee, you're probably wise to hedge your bets and go with nucs and packages this year.

Now, comparing 2008 and 2009 (You said 2010, but surely you've not installed nucs yet!), there are some basic questions to address;
1) Dd you buy packages and nucs from the same supplier?
2) What was the weather, and general honey flow for 2008, and 2009? In other words, how did your other colonies do in those two years?
3) Did you buy the same genetic strain of bees each year?
4) Are there other variables that might have influenced the production of the packages or nucs that should be considered?

My reasoning is there may be other issues at work than simply the difference between packages and nucs. Personally, I've had much better luck getting a surplus the first season with nucs, than with packages.
Regards,
Steven
 

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We started 2 last year. One made 2 suppers of honey, the other had a queenless period. No extra honey from that package.

They where both started out on new plastic mann lake frames
 

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Weather and plant dependence aside, they will only make the quantity of honey, in proportion to your skills in helping them do so. We routinely start 3 lb packages on drawn comb, split 3 from 2, and expect then to draw out 2 deeps each of foundation in the supers.

Roland
 
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