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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m thinking of transitioning from Rapid feeders to mason jars on my Nucs. Main reason because it’s one less item I have to build.

so from research so far I’m seeing people either buying a 70mm hole saw (which is hard to find) or 2 3/4” and sanding a little to size.

My question is what do you plug the hole with when not feeding?
 

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Are you not protecting the mason jar feeders with another box? What part does it save you from building?
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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I use a piece of asphalt shingle, 4 x 6 inch
1 old shingle makes like 12-15 covers. I like them due to their weight.
Heavy enough to not shift much
some 1/8 inch scrap would also work, pieces of glass if you have access. plastic cardboard political signs, etc...

GG
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are you not protecting the mason jar feeders with another box? What part does it save you from building?
No. No box over the top. Cut 70 mm hole in cover so that jar is tightly placed. Wanting to try on a few nucs this spring before I go all out.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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No. No box over the top. Cut 70 mm hole in cover so that jar is tightly placed. Wanting to try on a few nucs this spring before I go all out.
ok then my offer is not what you want.
i do the cover on the inner cover.

i guess the most available "cover" would be an empty jar with lid ....

GG
 

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Check out Randy Oliver jar feeding system. No need for a big hole in the top just a 3/16 inch hole will do
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I do pint mason jars, 3' hole in the inner cover covered with #8 hardware cloth. Set the mason jar on the screen. Cover the jar with a 5 frame medium super and a telescoping top. Easy to use and no bees get out while you are feeding, no need to suit up.
 

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I’m thinking of transitioning from Rapid feeders to mason jars on my Nucs. Main reason because it’s one less item I have to build.

so from research so far I’m seeing people either buying a 70mm hole saw (which is hard to find) or 2 3/4” and sanding a little to size.

My question is what do you plug the hole with when not feeding?
70 mm = 2.755 inch. I can guarantee a hole saw does not have +- 0.005 tolerance. You can find a 2-13/16 (2.81") hole saw online uxcell 2-13/16 Inch (71mm) Bi-Metal Hole Saw for Cutting Aluminum Copper Iron Zinc - - Amazon.com
 

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Hello,

I am feeding from October to April/early May with the below setup.

My telescopic lids have a 1.5" hole in the center with a stainless steel slide gate. I normally close it when it is cold and I want to remove the empty jar for filling so the bees don't come out (and they will at any temperature since they are often hanging in flocks under the feeder).

My hive covers are specially made with a wide rim and I have 2" insulation inside with the 1/4" plywood lid glued to the insulation. The 1.5" hole through the insulation has a 1.5" piece of plastic drain tube clued in so the bees don't shew the insulation up.

The jars have plastic screw lids with three very small holes drilled in, smallest drill bit I had.

I made 12" x 12" insulation blocks (one has a 10"x10" block that was rejected by me, not enough insulation) with holes drilled through four layers to fit the jars, the fifth is to cover the whole jar to keep it from going to low in temperature, all glued together. Change in temperature, sunlight etc. would over-pressure or under-pressure the jar and drip syrup in to the hive. Also, the wind would blow the empty jars off and the 12" blocks can nicely be weighted with a paver stone.

It is interesting to see how different each hive takes the syrup. The usage in the jar pictured is from 2 days. Others have not used any.

The inspection hole is also nice to see what is happening inside, checking for ice etc.

It works for me and I have noticed a hive I declared dead starting to feed again one week ago.

Fluid Liquid Glass Drink Drinkware
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Plant community Shrub Evergreen Peach Outdoor furniture
Wood Rectangle Concrete Composite material Wood stain
 

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Use a drill press and adjustable hole saw cutter on center of cover, make the hole snug but not overly tight, bees will wax/propolise it as well making it tighter. Being snug is important to hold the jar up in place when empty, too loose and strong winds will blow them out. and remember to always retighten the lid of syrup before invierting.

mason jars, mayo jars, and 5lb economy honey jars all use what is known as a 70g lid. Easily bought by the case. Go with the white lined ones, they last much longer in the weather when used as just a plug. We drill 3 tiny holes in our caps that allow the sugar to drip a bit then draw a vaccuum. The bees will clean up the drip and then find the holes, and suck it out as they need it.


Aaron
 

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Check out Randy Oliver jar feeding system. No need for a big hole in the top just a 3/16 inch hole will do
I also do that but I use a pop rivet into the cover (knock the center pin out, don't use the rivet gun) and JB weld the flared, hollow, tube into place on the lid.
 
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