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I see on YouTube that different people recommend that the hive stands be not level, but rather to have them slightly elevated in the back.

The elevation it to help keep driving rain from entering the opening and to make it easier for the bees to drag debris that accumulates on the floor out of the hive.

That all makes sense - although the angle of the tilt is not clear.

However: I plan to use homemade jar feeders - mason jars with holes in the lid. If this jars aren’t held level, at some point will the vacuum fail and they’ll dump their contents into the hive?
 

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I use gallon paint cans. All of my hives are slightly tilted as you mentioned. I have no problems with the vacuum. I suppose if the tilt were severe it might be an issue.
 

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Don't over think the angle, just enough that any water on the landing board would run away from/out the entrance rather than toward the back of the hive. It's not a plumbing drain angle, you're not moving solids.
 

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I make sure that my tilt angle is precisely no more than just a little bit.
So far it's been working well, jar feeders don't flood the hive.
 

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think more like a shim. say 2 paint sticks under the back of the hive. also think of a hive top feeder or even a frame feeder. mason jars eventually really suck. they work but a pain to keep filling. i ditched them when my bees propolized them and i couldn't open them easily.
 

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think more like a shim. say 2 paint sticks under the back of the hive. also think of a hive top feeder or even a frame feeder. mason jars eventually really suck. they work but a pain to keep filling. i ditched them when my bees propolized them and i couldn't open them easily.
All comes down to the individual keeper. I ditched the frame feeder and went back to the mason jars. Easy to tell if the water gets cloudy, easy to prep, and doesn't end up with bees drowning.
 

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All comes down to the individual keeper. I ditched the frame feeder and went back to the mason jars. Easy to tell if the water gets cloudy, easy to prep, and doesn't end up with bees drowning.
All true........i'll add in the fall and sunny it warms the syrup so they take more. Like i said i ditched them when i couldnt open the jars easily anymore in favor of plastic in hive feeders. 2 gallons at a time and zero dead.
 

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I see on YouTube that different people recommend that the hive stands be not level, but rather to have them slightly elevated in the back.

The elevation it to help keep driving rain from entering the opening and to make it easier for the bees to drag debris that accumulates on the floor out of the hive.

That all makes sense - although the angle of the tilt is not clear.

However: I plan to use homemade jar feeders - mason jars with holes in the lid. If this jars aren’t held level, at some point will the vacuum fail and they’ll dump their contents into the hive?
a little tilt won't matter. Right now I place 4 half gallon jars directly over 4 holes cut in the inner cover. I've found some cheap 1 gallon jars and I'm testing how many holes i can put in the lid before it drips.

I use gallon paint cans. All of my hives are slightly tilted as you mentioned. I have no problems with the vacuum. I suppose if the tilt were severe it might be an issue.
do you place it over the center hole in an inner cover? on shims?
 

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I use mayo or jam-jars - pint to a-pint-and-a-half - four at a time if needs be. They cost nothing, quick and easy to make, zero drowning.

It's easy to check for 'tilt tolerance' - make a few small holes in the lid (always punch into the jar, not outwards - although I prefer to drill holes) then half-fill with tap water and do a 'tilt test' over the sink. 20-30 degrees is not uncommon - far more than you'd ever tilt a hive.

I swear by 'em - having tried most other forms of feeder.
LJ

PS - I find leaking only ever occurs due to prolonged changes in either temperature or atmospheric pressure - so - I always install them within a feeder shell, and only give enough syrup that'll be consumed in a day or two. If they really need it, then the jar(s) are normally emptied overnight.
 

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do you place it over the center hole in an inner cover? on shims?
Although I prefer frame feeders, this thing is super easy to make when you are on a budget.

innercoverfdr.png

3/4 x 3/4 sticks glued to the bottom of a board with a hole cut in it for the jar. The jar is offset so it doesn't drip directly down the inner cover board hole. You can make it to hold more jars. Regular mouth mason jar lids are 2-3/4" outside diameter, wide mouth lids are 3-3/8" outside diameter. They make hole saws that fit both lid types, or you can trace the lid and use a sabre saw or even a coping saw by hand.
 

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a little tilt won't matter. Right now I place 4 half gallon jars directly over 4 holes cut in the inner cover. I've found some cheap 1 gallon jars and I'm testing how many holes i can put in the lid before it drips.



do you place it over the center hole in an inner cover? on shims?
I put them on shims. If I need to feed more than one gallon at a time, I can fit 2 cans inside of the deep...both on shims or even sticks.
 

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Same idea as above but you don't have to deal with the bees when refilling and they can't propolis the holes. Scrap material and a little 1/8" hardware cloth, can be made to hold multiple jars


feeder shim 4.jpg
 

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I place them directly on 4 hole cut in the inner cover, no mesh (1 in each quadrant). when I pick them up to replace them I always have to blow a few bees off the jar lid.
20190418_135710[1].jpg
 
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