Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New beek here and I still feel like I struggle a bit with frame manipulation. Interestingly, I don't really see this explicitly discussed in intro books or classes yet I think it's one things new beeks have difficulty with.

Specifically, I have trouble figuring out a good method for getting frames back in and touching against the other frames. In a busy hive, there are so many bees that, as soon as I put the frame in, tons of bees get in between the frames I am trying to push together. One strategy I have been doing lately is sliding the frame down a frame already in the hive, so the bees get pushed up or down but no bees can get smashed in between.

Is there any general advice for doing this better and more efficiently?
 

·
Moderator - In Memorium
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
Do not slide the frames down as you described, you will roll bees on the comb and kill them. Remove the first frame and set aside. Then as you put frames back in the hive, take advantage of the extra space and leave clearance on both sides of the frame. Slide the frame over tight to the wall and repeat. If you slide them over gently, the bees will get out of the way. Sometimes you have to pinch them slightly and then back the frame off to give them a hint. You will always crunch some bees when doing inspections. The key is to learn when this is most likely to happen, like setting the frame back down right as a bee darts underneath the top bar. Just be gentle and work slowly,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,087 Posts
Like JW said. I always move all the frames as a group to one side. When you put a frame back in, go slow and they will move. Keep frames tight on one side so when you put the last frame back in, the pinch point is only on one side of the frame. Then center by moving all as one by using your hive tool as a lever between the side all and frame. J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,261 Posts
If your box is tight so that ten frames just barely fit, it can help to only use 9 frames. Leave a gap at one edge and use that to pull the first frame out more easily. Then work your way across one frame at a time. Squash a lot fewer bees that way. If you find the queen then replace that frame with particular care.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top