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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What kind of bit would be required to cut rabbets in hive body with a table router. I don't have a table saw, but do have access to a table router, and I've seen in the posts that some of you folks use a router, any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks
Jake
 

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probably a straight bit. i use a dado blade, but the rabbets are the same. 3/8"x3/8" on the edges and 3/8"x5/8" for the frame rail to sit on. maybe a 1/2 or 5/8 straight bit.

G.
 

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If you have a lot of cutting to do get a spiral bit, I have found they cut cleaner , longer and stay cooler than a normal straight bit. They are a little more pricy and because they are solid carbide , they are fragile, don't drop on the concrete floor "voice of experience"
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for reply

1/2 is the largest i've found so I supposed you have to make 2 cuts to make the 5/8. I was also going to make 3/4 rabbit on ends to match sides.
 

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There is no reason that you have to use a router bit any wider than 3/8" to make hive bodies. The frame rest area is 5/8" x 3/8", so orient the board vertically and use a 3/8" (or 1/2") bit. Since you are using a table mounted router, add a taller auxiliary fence to the existing vertical fence and keep your workpieces pressed against the vertical fence as you slide them past the cutter.

If you are making the rabbets for the corner joints, you can use the same technique with the same bit.

Multiple passes may be a good idea for cuts of this depth, but that applies regardless of the size of bit you may be using.
 

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Routers are great tools especially for furniture. I find that building hive bodies, supers and components is a lot easier with a table saw. If you are not into furniture building you can get set up with a decent contractor table saw and dado blade at Harbor Freight for about $175. Pay attention to the comments as they are very instructive. Routers are great but difficult to set up and wrestling large pieces on a small table can be troublesome.
 

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3/4 x 3/4 will work. You want one that will cut 3/4in wide you can adjust the dept or the width on the router table. With the 3/4 in bit you can make the dado for the bottom boards or you set the fence to only cut 3/8ths to make the cut for the frame rest. I love my router table it is a lot faster than you might think it would be.
 

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3/4 x 3/4 will work. You want one that will cut 3/4in wide you can adjust the dept or the width on the router table. With the 3/4 in bit you can make the dado for the bottom boards or you set the fence to only cut 3/8ths to make the cut for the frame rest. I love my router table it is a lot faster than you might think it would be.
Good catch, i had forgotten about that cut.
 

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I have a lock miter router bit that I have used in the past for the end joints. Works great, a bit of a pain to set up to begin with, but makes the end cuts and assembly very easy with very little squaring required. Plus the wood requires just a bit more length as tboth end and side boards are full length. That little bit of difference in length becomes critical on 8' long dimensional lumber.

http://www.precisionbits.com/lock-miter-router-bit-set-45-degree-glue-joint-3-bits-yonico-15334.html

That said, the last boxes I made (yesterday) I used my radial arm saw to cut rabbets.
 

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I have a lock miter router bit that I have used in the past for the end joints. Works great, a bit of a pain to set up to begin with, but makes the end cuts and assembly very easy with very little squaring required. Plus the wood requires just a bit more length as tboth end and side boards are full length. That little bit of difference in length becomes critical on 8' long dimensional lumber.

http://www.precisionbits.com/lock-miter-router-bit-set-45-degree-glue-joint-3-bits-yonico-15334.html

That said, the last boxes I made (yesterday) I used my radial arm saw to cut rabbets.
I was looking at a biscuit cutter to join 45s with no exposed end grain. The problem I found with deeps is getting the cup out of deeps when cutting on the miter saw.
Same problem with your bit?
Annoying little corner void from the frame rest cut? Did you find a work around?
 
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