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Discussion Starter #1
Planning on making an uncapping tank. Thought about using a stainless sink, but finding one just right for the right price is tough. I could make my own from stainless sheet, but it would be much easier and faster, making one from 1/2" thick HDPE sheet, which should weigh about 24 pounds. I could make it exactly the way I want to hold 20 frames and uncap on the end. Any thoughts, or any reasons why this wouldn't be a good idea before I purchase the material, would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Tony
 

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Yes, food grade HDPR would work. Have you considered food grade ULINE crates. Model S-10717 fit my frame. Just need to add a honey gate. Alex madsen
 

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Simple solution, get food grade thick plastic, cut to the dimensions, go to harbor freight, but a plastic welder very cheap, build as you like. Also, you should be able to buy food grade liquid tanks with aluminum outer frame, and cut/weld as desired. Like 50.00 dollars at my local, and many different sizes. From 40- 50 gal and up
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thanks for the replies. I had tried finding a plastic tank that would work, but couldn't find the size i wanted. Also, they were way more expensive than what i could make it for. I plan to screw together with stainless screws. i will post pics when done
 

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Discussion Starter #10
never thought about the plastic welder. Will still use the screws , but the plastic welder would be a good idea to seal the inside corners.
 

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My first uncapping "tank" was a busted 10 frame box(bottom half of the end was gone). Bought a stainless backsplash sheet from menards for $36. Beat it with a hammer into a trough, screwed the sides to the inside of the box. The end of the stainless angled down and out the busted side of the box with a bucket below. I would then place uncapped frames into a good box on top of assembly. When I needed more room, I stacked on another box.
 

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never thought about the plastic welder. Will still use the screws , but the plastic welder would be a good idea to seal the inside corners.
Look into using water-thin solvent adhesives for the type of plastic you want to use. Butt joints on a table saw, cleaned up with a block plane. Apply the solvent and it's drawn into the joint through capillary action, welding the pieces together.

Hot air welding will certainly work, but it does take a bit of time to learn how to do it effectively, and best results occur using dry nitrogen, rather than compressed air, due to condensation in the air.
 

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HDPE has low surface energy and most adhesives will not bond to it. It is super important to select the correct adhesive. I must be low surface energy that is compatible with HDPE. also be sure to follow the surface preparation instructions exactly. My recommendation is to call Henkel Loctite and ask to speak to a applications engineer. They have some of the best bonding applications engineer in the busness and it is free.

http://www.loctite.com/en/channel-switch/usa.html

Alex Madsen
 

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You can put an online filter from tank to work area, these work great at removing virtually all moisture. I use these in painting and sandblasting all the time. From auto, to cabinet refinishing / spraying most all paint types.
 

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You can put an online filter from tank to work area, these work great at removing virtually all moisture. I use these in painting and sandblasting all the time. From auto, to cabinet refinishing / spraying most all paint types.
Yep, they work great for sandblasting and painting. Though, I'm guessing you've not done any plastic welding with compressed air and that inline filter.
 

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Very nice, may I ask where you purchased the hdpe from and how much it cost? I really like that you extended it out far enough to hold 20 frames. Did you seal the joints with a food safe caulk at all? Great idea .
I just purchased a Harmony farms uncapper as well. Hopefully it helps make honey extraction suck less. I found an old utility sink to refurbish that is the right width and depth to hold medium and deep, just need to figure out a food safe option for refinishing the inside of it that will come into contact with honey. I like yours better.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I bought the HDPE from MSC, I bought it thru work and got a little discount. MSC part#52421658-$136.70, I didn't seal the joints, thought about buying food grade sealant, but I'm not too worried about honey leaking out, joints are tight. I may get a piece of thin stainless and bend into a V so it honey flows towards the center, then prop one end up . I plan on making a wooden frame like an aquarium stand to sit the tank in.
I thought about using a utility sink also. When I was researching them, pretty sure some were made from polypropylene, but they were around $165.
Uncapping has been a slow process for me, I needed a better, faster process. Now I have to make a new rack for my extractor. it is a tangenal extractor and only holds 4 frames. I need to make a radial rack to hold a lot more frames and won't have to flip one. looked online trying to but a rack, but couldn't find much, Kelley Beekeeping sells a 9 frame rack that I may be able to use but it is $348.
 
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