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Discussion Starter #1
I have a double-deep brood box hive I've targeted to use to try my hand at queen rearing (grafting). I have 4 2-frame nucs with feeders built and ready. I've read a bunch so far, but have a couple of procedure questions...

1) Regarding the special frame that will house the cell cups, will that go in the main hive?
2) Since it has to be queenless, should I move the queen and two frames to a mating nuc in the meanwhile?
3) Can I then move the queen back into the main hive when I'm ready to move the cell cups to mating nucs?

Happy to follow any links/articles/videos you might share. Looking for something with more detailed steps.

I do want to do the grafting/mating nuc setup, just don't know about the order of things with respect to taking queens/frames out of main hive...

Thanks in advance for any direction!
 

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Why not just feed that hive untill they are packed in the hive, check every 5 days for swarm cells. I f you find queen cups with an egg or royal jelly in it , remove the queen with a few frames of capped brood and and one of honey into a nuc. Destroy all the queen cells you find and you can then attach plastic queen cups onto any frames top bar with molten bees wax graft into them and put that bar into the center of the bottom box and if you have done a good job with the grafts you could get 100% acceptance. I often do with 22 grafts at a time however with the small amount of queen mating nucs you will not need more than 10 grafts. When you have removed the queen cells after 10 days you can leave 1 cell in that hive and you will still get a honey crop from that hive.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Why not just feed that hive untill they are packed in the hive, check every 5 days for swarm cells. I f you find queen cups with an egg or royal jelly in it , remove the queen with a few frames of capped brood and and one of honey into a nuc. Destroy all the queen cells you find and you can then attach plastic queen cups onto any frames top bar with molten bees wax graft into them and put that bar into the center of the bottom box and if you have done a good job with the grafts you could get 100% acceptance. I often do with 22 grafts at a time however with the small amount of queen mating nucs you will not need more than 10 grafts. When you have removed the queen cells after 10 days you can leave 1 cell in that hive and you will still get a honey crop from that hive.
Thanks. What becomes of the original queen who goes into the nuc at the first step? Can she go back into original hive? Seems like losing time waiting for that 1 cell to emerge?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok, found a pretty thorough article, and I'm tracking with it. I like the simplicity (link below to the article). Couple of questions...
It references removing young brood the day before grafting, so that the nurse bees are really ready to feed. Is that critical? Could I put them in a mini nuc, or simply back below the cloake board?
Also, can I leave the grafts in until right before they hatch, then move to mating nucs for hatching? The article calls for moving them out so you can graft more, but I won't need more...

Thanks again!


https://www.delta-business.com/CalgaryBeekeepers/Bee-Club-Library/Queens%20and%20Nucs/Cloake%20Board%20Method%20of%20Queen%20Rearing%20and%20Banking%20Sue%20Cobey.pdf
 
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