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Anyone used this piece of equipment? I cannot find any reviews anywhere. I have heard anecdotal reports that you can let this run with no starter and with out pasteurizing first and it will beat the crystals smaller. Anyone with experience care to share?
 

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We have used one for over a year now. We run between 120# and 240# per week. We always use seed and honey that has been warmed to make sure there is no rogue course crystals. It works great. Never had an issue. It just stirs so I don't think it will beat down any big crystals. We never heat our honey above 100 deg. Don't pasteurize and kill the goodness. We make our own starter and always use it. We make a batch every 48 hours. Just took out 120# of huckleberry, and have 120# of tripleberry going now.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
We have used one for over a year now. We run between 120# and 240# per week. We always use seed and honey that has been warmed to make sure there is no rogue course crystals. It works great. Never had an issue. It just stirs so I don't think it will beat down any big crystals. We never heat our honey above 100 deg. Don't pasteurize and kill the goodness. We make our own starter and always use it. We make a batch every 48 hours. Just took out 120# of huckleberry, and have 120# of tripleberry going now.
Great info! Thanks!!
 

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Hi folks, and thanks for the useful info in this thread.
I am wondering if there are distinct advantages to the heated creamers, other than melting crystallized honey. Although I believe the heater aspect would be handy, I already own a water jacketed heater/bottling tank, and the difference in price between the heated and unheated models certainly makes me think twice about purchasing the heated model. Any further insight would be much appreciated. Thanks!
 

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Are you keeping the honey within a certain temperature range while it crystallizes using this machine? Most processes for making creamed honey recommend temperature as close to 57 degrees as possible.
 

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Are you keeping the honey within a certain temperature range while it crystallizes using this machine? Most processes for making creamed honey recommend temperature as close to 57 degrees as possible.
I've used this creamer for the last year and find that the creamed honey it makes is very nice. I never worry about de-crystallizing. I use honey as soon after extraction as possible. My clients rave about the smooth spreadable honey even after 12 months sitting on the self. I find that the best creamed honey is made with honey that crystallizes at a moderate or slow rate and is processed by the machine for up to five days. Rapidly crystallizing honey like canola honey sets up so fast that creaming is complete in 2 or three days.
 

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You don't let the honey cream in the machine. If you did you wouldn't be able to get it out of the gate. The machine only mixes the seed into the honey and then gets the process started. The actual creaming process takes place in the jar or tub.
 

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You don't let the honey cream in the machine. If you did you wouldn't be able to get it out of the gate. The machine only mixes the seed into the honey and then gets the process started. The actual creaming process takes place in the jar or tub.
Because the machine runs every 15 minutes during the 24 hour cycle the honey does not set solid quickly (unless you are dealing with pure canola honey). Each time the machine runs the crystals are broken into smaller crystals. I have found that the longer run time (5 days) produces very fine crystals and a wonderful creamed honey (5 days is also recommended by the manufacturer) . Canola honey has never lasted longer than three days in my machine. You have to check it daily to ensure that the honey will still flow.
 
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