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Had a swarm enter a bait hive May 1st. Within a couple days pollen was being brought in and there were drones present. I figured it would be acceptable to transfer them into a permanent home, same location, different box. No eggs or queen was spotted at the time of transfer (May 3rd). It was a small swarm(3 medium frames at most). I placed a frame of newly build comb with eggs from another colony in the new box. A week later (May 10th) there were 3 or 4 capped queen cells. They drew another comb that had eggs in it. I didn't spend much time trying to find the queen so can't say if she was there, but I was concerned at the amount of eggs in each cell. 2 to 5 eggs in the back of many of the cells. All eggs are center back of the cells and not on the sides. First thought, laying worker. Then I started thinking it could be a secondary swarm with a newly mated queen trying to get the hang of laying. There is limited drawn comb so I'm hoping it's a newly mated queen just trying to figure it out. I can't see how a laying worker would start laying right after they swarmed and a few days after eggs were placed in their new home. I think it's a LW on one hand and a new queen on the other. I've read more than 2 eggs its a LW. I am going to wait another week before looking again and see what happens.
 

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Just check in a week to see if it's worker brood or drone brood, but with limited space, I suspect a new eager queen.
 

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I second that, new queen with limited space will often lay more than one egg in a cell. I have seen it often with packages in new equipment.
I use to think the workers moved them as cells were built, bit now I am inclined to believe they simply destroy the extras.
 

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In a swarm that small you should be able to spot her. it won't hurt to check just be gentle with queen cells frames. Black queens can be difficult to find, good sun helps me alot.

Young queens will lay multiples at first, the workers usually clean them out, but not always. Even older good strong queens lay multiples, when grafting i usually find atleast 1 or 2 cells with 2 larvae per cell. The concerning part is 5 eggs, i've seen more than 2-3 from a true queen. But like JRG states, with limited space its possible.

Also watch what happens to the queen cells, they are usually torn down with a few days of being capped, sometimes a bit longer but if a queen is there she won't let them pupate.
 
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