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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a "wild colony" in a hole in a living tree, I am trying to coax them into a hive anyone had any sucess with something like this ?
I have coated the foundations in hive with 1: 1 sugar water and have a boardman feeder installed they are useing the feeder.
I am hoping if they swarm they will go into the hive approxamately 3 ft from existing entrance to tree
anyone know if this is likely ?
 

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Welcome to Beesource!

You are unlikely to be able to lure a colony out of their home since they have live brood and won't leave them to die.

However, as Mathesonequip mentioned, you may be able to trap the bees. You may find these threads useful:

http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...ut-from-a-tree

http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?265612-trap-out
You can send your email address to Cleo Hogan (see the second thread) for a copy of his trapout guide.

Also, leaving the colony in the tree alone, they may cast off swarms that you may be able to either trap or catch as they swarm. You can make your trap more attractive by placing 3-4 drops of lemongrass oil on the wood inside the hive body.

.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the links I will check them out
I did not think I could actually get the orginal colony out but hope to "lure" the swarm if
possble
 

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I don't think it will work, better to make a screen cone, like a funnel maybe six inches long and have a hole in the bottom large enough for bees to get out but not back in. The broad part of the funnel must be attachd to the tree so well that bees can not find a way back into the hive. I onlt read about it and never tried it. Supposedly bees that mature and the queen will eventually come out. The more I think about it the less I think it would work. I suppose it would help to have the funnel end letting the bees enter into a hive box containing frames with some honey, pollen and an entrance small enough to prevent robber bees to immediately take over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks to all for the info, I think I the info to look up Cleo Hogan, and his method seems to be my best alternative. If I can trap enough bees to start one or two new colonies per year
I would perfer that to just removing them
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
built a trap out ( thanks to Cleo Hogan) and installed the tunnel portion today on the tree.
going to let them get used to it for a couple of days then add the hive box:)




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one thing I had to change the board to attach trap out to tree which I though was a good idea , however the tree did not cooperate and i was not able to attach them properly.
wound up removing them off and inserting the trap tunnel into cavaity placed one board across top and bottom secured to tree with screws stapled the black plastic to tree.
they are going in and out through tunnel now.:applause:

the groves in end of tunnel that goes into hive box are to insert a door with a funnel cone to let bees in but not back into tree if i ever need to completly remove a colony from a tree in the future. but now am only interested in getttin some more bees for starters.
 
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