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From your knowledge and experience, what would you say the lowest the temperature should be for someone to open the top of a hive to add/remove frames from a "to be cleaned" super put on top of the inner cover?

Estimated time would be how long it takes to take 8 frames out and put 8 frames in. Add time if there are bees on the cleaned frames.

I put frames on to be cleaned Monday when it was 75 degrees. Now it is a high of about 45F. Dang Great Lakes weather.
 

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If they are on top of the inner cover and there are no bees in the super just take it of now,but here around the Great Lakes just wait a few days we will need the air coditioner.I feel your pain!!!!!!!!
 

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The lowest temperature was last winter when I looked do bees have mated queen or drones. Temperature was -8C (18 F).

Queen was unmated and bees had raised drones whole winter. Most brood were contaminated with chalkbrood.

To me normal limit is 62F if I take frames out from hive. If brood frame gets cold soon chalk brood appear in the comb.

Small hive stand very badly openin during cold weather. Whole brood area will get chalkrood.

If bees have not brood it can be opened when ever.

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It was 52 F here and my bees were all flying. I have no problem opening a hive if the bees are flying. I'll peek in or put some pollen patties on even when it's freezing out, but I wouldn't leave them open long and I wouldn't pull any frames out.

[ October 13, 2006, 08:42 PM: Message edited by: Michael Bush ]
 

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Finman are you sure that what you call chalkbrood is actually rather chilled-dead brood?
I thought I had chalkbrood until someone with more knowledge showed me they were just chilled and had died.
 

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>MB do you make your own pollen patties...? If so, can you share a recipe..?

Sure. Take 100% real pollen and mix with with just enough 100% real honey to make a dough. Put the dough in balls on waxed paper and spread them out with a rolling pin.
 

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>Take 100% real pollen and mix with with just enough 100% real honey to make a dough.

Sounds good enough to eat. Chow down a spoonful of that in the morning and you could push your car to work. Save gas!
 

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You can certainly open the top for a look. The bees may be clustered down below - then just remove the super and close them back up.

I've often installed packages with temps around 40 and with snow on the ground. Temps would then drop below freezing over night. I've never had problems in those conditions unless the bees couldn't get in the hive quickly. There are always those few bees in the corner of the package that just can't seem to get out.

Having no wind plus some bright sunlight can also be a benefit when opening in the cold.
 
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