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So I'm late getting my hives in order for the winter, but tried to do just that earlier today. I have two hives and both are three boxes of medium eight frames. Both hives had roughly 3-4 frames of capped honey on the top box, but the next boxes down were approx 90% uncapped honey/nectar. It was pretty cold out and the bees were pretty testy so i didn't bother investigating the last box. I'm wondering though if this is normal or not? Is it ok to leave that much uncapped honey in the hive? Also I took off the three frames of capped bc of the extra dead space, but wasn't sure if that was the right call. I thought about combing the two boxes of frames to get 1full box and then put it on one of the hives. I also thought it might be better instead to put in some type of follower boards on both hives. Any advice would be helpful. Thanks in advance!
 

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You are probably all right...But, it all depends on your location. There must be forty states with a town called Ashville. :)

Honey reserves needed to over winter is a very local quantity and will vary from year to year. Talk to people at your local bee club for that local knowledge. :)

P.S. I would leave the honey in the hive, you always need to look out for wax moths and SHB in frames like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm in North Carolina if it helps.
So uncapped honey is ok to leave in? I wasn't sure if it would cause humidity problems or not.
 

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I'm in North Carolina if it helps.
So uncapped honey is ok to leave in? I wasn't sure if it would cause humidity problems or not.
Yes, the hive must have a way to get rid of excess moisture in winter anyway. I cut a small kerf, (several small cuts to add up to about a half or three quarters of an inch in width), in the top side of one end of the inner cover to allow for a little air circulation to remove excess moisture over the winter. Giving and taking beekeeping advice is always predicated on location, location, location. HTH :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Okay thanks for the advice. I put a 2 inch spacer with a candy board and a 3/8 ths hole on the top. I'm hoping that'll be enough for ventilation.
 

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Just be sure you have robbing screens in place. The yellow jackets are looking for something to eat too and will squeeze into a hive wherever they can.
 

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Just be sure you have robbing screens in place. The yellow jackets are looking for something to eat too and will squeeze into a hive wherever they can.
I just installed entrance reducers with the small opening yesterday. A reduced entrance will help with robbing as well. :)
 
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