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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Fellow Beeks

I just found my queen bee in front of my only hive. I was wondering why and what could have happened? I have not opened it since October but the bees are buzzy bringing in pollen and neuter so I know that there is brood being raised. I'm just wondering if there will bee nought drones to mate with the new queen in this time of the season? Plz let me know what I can do. Thanks you all

Mr buzzy
 

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You have to look ahead to a time when a new queen will emerge, you have a few weeks and By then there will be ample drones. In general if the bees are flying there are drones. Do you know that you do not have a queen now? I am assuming the queen you are referring to in front of your hive was, found dead? you did not say. If weather permits go through the hive, look for a young queen, or signs of one, or queen cells, it is possible that your queen was superseded, once the new queen emerged she vanquished the old queen, or the attendants quit feeding her and she perished. Her corps would then be discarded. in any event the hive bears monitoring until you are sure what is happening,
 

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Maybe they superseded in the autumn and have just got rid of the old queen.
Two queens often coexist over winter.
Check for eggs. You may well have a new laying queen in there.
 

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If you haven't opened the hive then you don't know if there is brood or not. If there is very young larva and eggs then you should be in good shape. Here in southern CA my hives are making drones like crazy. A second hive would make your life a lot easier. I have rolled my queen even when being very careful, and it helps greatly to have a second hive to provide eggs and brood when you need them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to all for your replies. I had 5 hives before winter struck the cold snap struck here in northern California. All 4 out of 5 hives perished even with enough stores to hold them over. The hive that survived is a pure breed of Carniolan. I love this breed and hope to capture some swarms from it this year.
 

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Sorry to hear about your heavy losses. Our bee club down here had a lot of losses during the cold snap too. One guy lost 20 out of 25. Hopefully you can bounce back this year. The good news is that you have a lot of queen producers nearby.
 

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It is sad to see so many losses. Have to think on the bright side now that you still have many resources to build up more hives in this season. Thinking ahead of time that for this many losses you should build up to 15 hives either from swarm capture or split from this hive if it is still going. If this hive is queenless now then you can find a new queen locally. The worker bees still bring in pollen thinking everything is o.k. Then they will develop the laying worker at the same time it is drone rearing time in March. My bees are preparing to rear some drones that my local beekeeper called today. I think he is a bit too late now.
 
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