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THIS THE SECOND TIME MY HIVES DID NOT MAKE THROUGH WINTER ! I FEED I FUMED I WRAP THE HIVE EVERYTHING THAT I DIDNT DO THE FRIST TIME. WHAT AM I DOING WRONG ONE HIVE MY STONGEST STILL HAD 60lBS OF HONEY DEAD BABYS IN THE CELL IS THE MITES? I WANT TO TRY ONE MORE TIME BUT I FEEL LIKE GIVING UP.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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Do you monitor for Varroa mites? Whatever method you use to control the Varroa, you need to monitor. There are mites that are resitant to Apistan and Check-mite. Sometimes the method of delivery or other details may cause OTHER methods to fail too. Do not take it on FAITH that there are no mites. COUNT THEM. Put a sticky board in if you don't have a Screened Bottom Board. Put a tray in if you DO have a SBB. Count the natural mite fall. Monitor them once a week or once every two weeks or once a day, but have a routine where you count them and keep track of them.

Look at the bees and debris on the bottom and look for Varroa. A few don't mean anything, but thousands are a pretty good indication that they died from the Varroa mites.

The Varroa are about the size of a period on this page. They are purplish brown and slightly oval shaped.

Other possible causes for the bees dying are a cluster that couldn't move. Too much condensation (wet bees). Tracheal mites. And several other diseases that take advantage of stessed out bees from one of these causes.

Have you tried small cell? Try 4.9mm foundation. It will help with both kinds of mites. Some people have observed that the small cell bees are more hygenic. Since they are the ONLY bees I've had in my observation hive, I don't have a frame of reference to compare them to, but they do have less problems with mites.

If you are looking to end up with bees that don't require constant attention, 4.9mm cell size is the only way I know of to get that in the long run. In the short run, you STILL need to monitor the mites and try to keep them alive until they are fully regressed.
 

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>The Varroa are about the size of a period on this page.

It seems to me that we do not all have the same screen size. It would take at least two or two and a half of the periods on my screen to make the size of a varroa mite.
 

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Hey benoeth,
Dead babies in the cells? IMO you need to get an experienced beekeeper and/or the state apicurist to check out your hive. How did other beekeepers in your area fair this winter? With 60lbs of honey and drawn comb you have a great start on the 2004 season.
 

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THANKS FOR THE REPLYS , I THOUGH THE FGMO WOULD CONTOL THESE MITES I HAVE SCREEDED BOTTOM BOARDS JUST MADE IMPROVMENT OVER THE WINTER WITH A PULL OUT DRAW AND A CAGED 25WATT LIGHTBULB FOR HEAT IN THE WINTER .IM FUMING THEM BUT I NOT PUTTING ROPE TREATMENT AS FOR THE CELL YOU MENTIONED MIKE I SEE THAT PRODUCT IN CATALOGES BUT THEY SAY FOR EXPERIANCED BEE KEEPERS ONLY? WHY?SOULD I JUST DO THE BROAD CHAMBERS? WHAT SHOULD I KNOW?AS FOR FINDING SOME TO COME TO LOOK AT MY HIVES NO SUCCESS I LIVE IN A RURAL AREA
 

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If I remember correctly, you are in Delhi? The Catskill Mtn Beekeepers will be meeting the 13th of April in Acra @ 7:00 pm. If you wanted, you could bring a frame to have it looked at.
The topic will be winter losses and causes.
The website for the club is: www.catskillbees.org
There is a state inspector in the area, I don't have his name, but someone in the club should.
The winter losses in the area from what I have seen in my own yards and talking with someothers were fairly high.
No breaks in the weather from December thru beginning of March, very cold right thru.
I lost 10 hives, my worst winter yet(50%). The last one a little over a week ago during the single digits we had again.
As for the young in the cells, what stage are they at? larva, pupa, capped, developed and partially emerged? Does it look like the queen started laying again?
When was the last time you were able to check them and knew they were alive?
It is not uncommon, to have hives cold starve after they have started to raise brood agian in the late winter / early spring. We have had some very cold weather until very recently.
The cluster will pull tight to keep the brood warm, and then starve with honey with in inches or less.

To get to Acra Community Center, Rte 23 East to the Acra Manor, make a left on to Rte 31, left at stop sign, 1/2 mile on left, set back off the road.

Another option:
Dick Johnson's Beginner Course on Beekeeping. This course is sponsored by the Cornell Cooperative Extension. $50 tuition for the four evenings. Call Dick for more information (518-734-4629)
April 7, 14, 21, 28
6:30-8:30
Agro-Forestry Center, Acra, NY

[This message has been edited by MountainCamp (edited March 30, 2004).]
 

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>I HAVE SCREEDED BOTTOM BOARDS JUST MADE IMPROVMENT OVER THE WINTER WITH A PULL OUT DRAW AND A CAGED 25WATT LIGHTBULB FOR HEAT IN THE WINTER .

There is such a thing as trying to do TOO much. I think that you should go to the club meetings and rub elbows with local beekeepers and find a mentor. It sounds like the topic for this meeting is just what you need.
 

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Hi Benoeth,
Misery loves company so here's my input. The 1st year (2 years ago) I went into the winter with what I thought were 8 strong hives. one was still alive in Jan for a little but they all died. In the spring I bought 20 nucs and fed them heartily. 5 went down with foulbrood and 1 more to chalkbrood. Went into the winter with 14 and came out with 10. I've got ten packages coming to replace the losses.
Giving up is always an option. I got hooked on the challange. I'm doing it with FGMO and nothing else so I expect some losses. If I had to start over I'd do the drug routine until I learned more. As you see, you need some success to keep you going. I'm off to a bee club in a few minutes. I always learn something. The light bulb thing may not have been a good idea. Bees can survive for awhile in a freezer. I've never heard of anyone doing that (with the bulb). It may have thrown their regulation out of whack.
For all my losses, there was no sight as great as seeing the survivors start flying this spring. Hang tough,

Dick Marron
 

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Just a casual observation. This seems to me (from all the reading on this site) to be common in the areas with the most bee keeping. Makes sense as you are more likely to have cross contamination with higher populations.
 

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>I THOUGH THE FGMO WOULD CONTOL THESE MITES

I only say this to try to help everyone in the future. It's not enough to THINK your method of mite control is working. Whatever the method. Maybe it is. Maybe it isn't. You need to KNOW. Do mite drop counts consistently and then you will KNOW if you have them under control or not.
 
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