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Long story short I have this hive that i captured this spring from the porch of a house where they lived all winter. It is a very strong hive with a good queen. I was able to cut the coub out and held it in place with rubber bands that the bees slowly removed over the next few weeks. The amount of coub I removed filled a deep and another half of a deep. Then the rest I filled up with new frames. The next few weeks the hive did very well and started filling up the second deep with more brood and honey. After a few weeks I then put a honey super on top to give them more room and hoping they would start filling it. Now after about a month later they never went up to the super and filled the second deep with honey. So when took the hive apart yesterday I realized that the hive swarmed and there are at least 11-15 queen cells in the bottom deep. What should I do now and why didn't they go up into the super? Looking for some help and wondering if I did something wrong.

Thanks
 

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do a search at the top of the page for "honey cap" and "swarm prevention"
good luck,mike
 

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The next few weeks the hive did very well and started filling up the second deep with more brood and honey.
Thanks
When a hive starts building up well the population increases. The population increase requires that they start storing more honey for winter. The result is they run out of space for honey so they decide to swarm.

Also, When a hive starts building up well the amount of honey they can store increases. The result is that they start running out of space for brood so they decide to swarm.

The bottom line is that building up to swarm is the very nature of bees. It is the way they have developed to reproduce. You will never stop it. You can only try to work with it. We are all fighting the same fight. You will never always win. The fun part is that sometimes you do win. We have all watched some of our best queens fly off to start a new life without us. We ALL share your pain or will soon enough.

The only thing I think of is that we get used to avg queens and hives and our management and 'space' plans are based on that. Then this big-mama-egg-machine queen falls into our laps and we just don't see it until she is out of space and gone. The only good part is that she usally leaves some very good queen cells. Make nucs from them and then give them space next season.
 
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