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I did an informal study on this myself while working at the Dyce Bee Lab. We introduced about 2 dozen queens, half with and half without attendants. No difference.

But, I think a lot depends on conditions. It is much easier to introduce queens during a honey flow than during a dearth. It is much easier to introduce to nucs than to full size hives.

In fact, with valuable queens, I would always introduce into a nuc, and then combine the nuc with a full sized colony, if that is the goal.

However, if you want to get the attendants out, here is a neat trick I use. Maybe others have used it, as well. You need an empty queen cage.

You take the cork out of the one with the bees in it and put the two cages hole to hole. About half of the bees will move into the other cage.

Repeat this with the queen and remaining bees, until you have only the queen in one of the cages!
 

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This is from Tom Glenn

The queen(s) you have received are in a combination shipping and introduction cage. There is no need to remove the worker bee attendants. Both ends of the cage have corks. Leave the cork in the end with bees. This cage provides food (white sugar candy) during shipment which also acts as a "timed release" barrier for your hive bees to eat through, allowing several days pheromone adjustment period.
 
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