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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is a good/inexpensive extractor... have only 2 hives thank you..... not considering one with motor,,, hand crank should be OK..

Thank you,

Gary
 

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I don't know if your local bee club has an extractor, but we all voted to buy one together with club funds for all the members to use, and check it out from the local ag extension office. It's a great alternative to having to invest a lot of money in something you only use only a few days a year.
 

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You know Gary, you'll most likely have most tell you don't bother, do crush and strain, borrow one, bee clubs, etc. Well I say go for it. Buy a small one. I bought the plastic two frame extractor from Walter Kelley, mine was actually on sale as a kit with the uncapping kit, two buckets, a fine and course straining screens, and extractor for $220. I think the extractor alone is like $165 or so. It was worth every penny. First year one hive everyone said don't expect honey, be happy if they live, la, la, la. Well I bottled 85lbs from that hive the first year and that extractor was on time. It's not the best quality, but for a couple of hives it will do and you will get your money's worth. If you are in a club and thy lend or rent one or you know someone, then by all means borrow. But if not, just check out those plastic ones, they'll work for you. Crush and strain pains me, doesn't yield the as much, is messy and very time consuming, but that's just me.
 

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I'm with ordy28 on the 2 frame plastic extractor. You will appreciate it even more after trying crush/strain.
I picked one up to demonstrate how to extract to all those folks who can't fathom what we do, and what the bees are capable of doing.
It has held up and has more than paid for itself, I even use it on occasion for extracting those odd frames that I don't have enough of to put through the larger extractor.
Betterbee sells one for about 140$, a couple of 5 gal buckets from the farm supply and a big mesh paint strainer, a long serrated bread knife and a uncapping fork and you are good to go- the compete setup for about 170$. You'll be thrilled with the ease of extracting and the results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for help guys... went ahead and ordered Vivo stainless steel extractor-- good for deeps, mediums, and short frames.... plus knife, comb,and 2 part strainer... @ $250 total....not a bad deal at all.. just like skydiving-- if you know you love it and plan on staying involved-- buy the gear and save the $$$ spent renting!!!
 

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This is my first year with 4 hives, I do not expect to harvest honey but if I do I want to preserve the comb for future use. For this reason I believe a small extractor makes sense. I have no experience with extraction or crush and strain, comb preservation is more important to me than honey. I will probably buy a starter kit it will make the adventure smoother.

Mike K
 

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For the life of me, I can't find the website or youtube video of where you can buy these. The parts are easy to come by and not hard to make. I made this one (tip, get a socket from a pawn shop to set into the end of the PVC). It worked good for my one hive and will use it this year for both of my hives.

Hopefully someone can piece in the website with more pictures, videos etc

 

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Looks pretty simple, but I would make the square wooden blocks bigger so that the bottom bars of the frames will fit up against (or almost so) the PVC pipe. That way it becomes a radial extractor, and you can do 4 frames at once.

For the life of me, I can't find the website or youtube video of where you can buy these. The parts are easy to come by and not hard to make. I made this one (tip, get a socket from a pawn shop to set into the end of the PVC). It worked good for my one hive and will use it this year for both of my hives.

Hopefully someone can piece in the website with more pictures, videos etc

 

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As it stands, the rotating assembly will fit inside a couple of stacked 5 gallon buckets. If you modify it to be a radial style with medium frames, the diameter will be too big to use 5 gallon buckets as the tank.



> For the life of me, I can't find the website or youtube video of where you can buy these.

That photo looks a lot like the extractor kit available here: http://www.honeyspinner.com/
 

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Round trash can from Wal Mart will work just fine.

As it stands, the rotating assembly will fit inside a couple of stacked 5 gallon buckets. If you modify it to be a radial style with medium frames, the diameter will be too big to use 5 gallon buckets as the tank.



> For the life of me, I can't find the website or youtube video of where you can buy these.

That photo looks a lot like the extractor kit available here: http://www.honeyspinner.com/
 

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>This is my first year with 4 hives, I do not expect to harvest honey but if I do I want to preserve the comb for future use.

It seems like a noble idea, but keep in mind that bees draw comb, it's one of the things they do, and they can draw it quite quickly. Consider the worth of drawn comb against the cost of an extractor. Drawn comb, while it is an asset, is also a liability. You have to protect it from the wax moths and small hive beetles.

> For this reason I believe a small extractor makes sense. I have no experience with extraction or crush and strain, comb preservation is more important to me than honey.

Why? The ONLY real advantage to preserving comb IS honey.
 

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I traded a couple of swarms for a small stainless one this year but I seen Mann Lake is doing a plastic one for under $200.
 
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