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My hive stands are made from cement blocks. I like them but they are not exactly decorative if you know what I mean. The better half has asked me to replace the hive stands in our yard with ones that would look a bit better. so if there are any ideas out there bring em on, I'd appreciate it.

I thought about making ones out of synthetic decking material. What I like about the cement blocks is they are inexpensive, hold up to the weight, and easy to move and set up.
 

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I switched from cement blocks to 8' treated 2x6s. I'm glad I did. They look better and I get 3 or 4 on each. Level them well with a slight drop to the front so water will run off the top covers and out of the bottom boards if rain blows in. The 2x6s make a good place to set frames when checking or replacing.
 

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Walter Kelly is going to sell hive stands made of angle iron. They should be in the new catalog. I saw them and they look nice. I do not know the cost.
 

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HAB. Are those robber screens on most of your hives. I am wondering, if they all have screens don't they figure out how to get into the other hives in short order?????
 

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My stands aren't so pretty, but I like hives setting on rails, 16 to 20 inches off the ground is nice.
RayMarler,

I had a friend who used Rails for his hives, but his bottom board didn't have a lip on it to keep it from sliding off the rails. We almost lost one as we tried to put Formic Acid Pads on.

I didn't realize that you were in Marysville - I have an uncle who lives in that town as well. he is getting up there and I was looking at visiting him sometime in 2010. Perhaps you wouldn't mind a fellow beek stopping in and visiting you and your beeyards as well.
 

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I like rounded treated landscape timbers. Three eight footers make two individual stands. I cut Two in quarters and the other into 16 inch +/- lengths. Then I nail/screw/bolt them together Lincoln log like 24" on 16" on 24". I align the side rails of the bottom boards on the flats of the 24" top logs. At $3.50 a timber they look nice, are one piece, are easy to level and don't rot.
 

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Concrete Block #1 hands down if you are on permanent location I'm short so 1 block high is just wright if you have a couple of deep broods and 3 or 4 medium supers put it kinda high.

I like to place my colonies far enough apart so I can work from at least 1 side.

Can face them at different directions to keep drifting down.

They are more stable I have seen a few disasters with stands when high winds come along or they start getting heavy and all fall over (ouch)

I would get my wife to help with a plane to make them look better by painting them or she may have an idea in make one out of some landscaping timbers what ever way you go the Single stands I like best for working them and being able to face in a slight different direction keeping down drifting
 

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Hope you are having a good Christmas Paul, Warm weather around the corner, well not as long as it has been !
 

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Perhaps a simple solution would be to keep the concrete blocks that I assume are doing a good job of supporting your hives and disguise them with some lattice made with thin strips of pressure treated wood. Big box stores sell them in 4'x8' and 2'x8' pieces that you could cut to length and simply wire together at the ends.

Wayne
 

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When I only had two hives, I built tables (background) (figuring if the hives didn't make it - I would have functional work furniture!). Now that I am hooked though, I build stands with 4x4 legs and integrated landing boards (foreground), mostly because I like the way they look and my daughter (4) can paint the landing boards. I had a lot of scrap 4x4 after I completed our fence - so I just put it to use.

http://picasaweb.google.com/mshaughnessy/Bees#5419382889931743458
 

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I use treated 4x6 timbers cut to 24". My wife is picky how things look in the yard and she had no complaints.

I don't like to have my hives sitting so high because when you get 3 to 4 honey supers on them in July then I have to lift the full supers from about chest high and its hard on my back.

If the hive is on a slope one of he 4x6 can be rotated 90 degrees to help level the hive.
 

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NDnewbeek,
My hive stands look almost Idendical. I love having a large deck for my hives to sit on...makes a good place to set things and doesn't look half bad.
 

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Good Morning Hampton:
Here is a link to pictures of my hive stands. Have lots a critters around our house, including the neighbors cows, that are always out. This makes them pretty secure and more difficult for Bessie to knock over. They are about 18" off the ground, so there is no bending. Screened bottom boards a screwed down to the 2x6's. I can still see in at 7 medium boxes high. Higher than that, then I need a step. hhh

http://www.geodes4u.com/hivepics.html
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks again guys. I have a lot to think about. Right now I'm leaning towards putting lattice around them. I'll send pictures when I'm done.
 
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