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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I've got a question for those out there that have used or are using currently a LONG Lang style hive box.
I've always heard the old line about bees go UP. However when they take up residence in a house attic, or a downed tree, going UP is not an option and they seem to do well even in those cases. So my question is simply this - How do the bees winter in a Long Lang box? Do they make it through as well or better than in a standard Lang? You Top Bar Hive guys can chime in on this as well.

I'm considering putting some splits into Long Langs - I just like the idea of being able to open some of the hive at a time and not agravate the entire hive at one time, possibly setting it up like a Top Bar Hive just using frames that can be moved easily.

So what are your thoughts about this style hive everyone?
 

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I have both, the long lang is handy not having to remove boxes to check the bees , they can winter well but the cluster has to be to one end or the other in fall so they dont eat themselves away from there stores. It is much harder to get honey from the long hive, same frames but different configuration. A few frames were all honey but most have a honey crown on top and brood below, you cant take the honey off without removing the brood. I went foundationless. Unless box lifting is a problem I recommend starting with standard boxes and then experiment with others, long, kenyan etc...
 

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BGhoney, Thank you so much for your reply. This helps me a whole lot more then you may think. Knowing now that they don't store honey the same way with a long lang makes this decision a lot easier. Honey is going to just be a byproduct for me in a couple years as i plan to be selling bees in the end, however till then i'm going to need what honey the girls can give extra to help finance the next year. So with that said, i'm going to stick with the normal Lang for now. Again, thanks a million!
 

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If your goal is selling bees, the long Langs will work great. I have tried them, used them, and like them, for making nucs. In late Fall I always moved the brood nest to one end and the stored honey to the other. Let the bees overwinter and move only in one direction. Never had a problem with starvation. I still run some square hives, (13 frames), and I do the same for them. The advantage in making nucs is, you don't have to set boxes off to get to the brood.

I made mine 27 frames long, three inner covers, (you can remove as you wish to work them), then an outer cover to cover the entire hive. Not so good for making honey, but great for making up nucs. Nice to work at one level.

cchoganjr
 

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They are awesome for making bees. I have 8 of them and that's what I use them for.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>I've always heard the old line about bees go UP. However when they take up residence in a house attic, or a downed tree, going UP is not an option and they seem to do well even in those cases.

And horizontal hollow limbs and gas tanks of abandoned cars, and abandoned hot water heaters that are laying on their side...

>So my question is simply this - How do the bees winter in a Long Lang box? Do they make it through as well or better than in a standard Lang? You Top Bar Hive guys can chime in on this as well.

No difference if they start the winter at one end so they don't leave stores behind. Or if you get some warm days during winter for them to rearrange stores or move it may not even be that important that they be at one end...

I winter a few horizontal hives every winter with the no better or worse losses as any other kind of hive.
 

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My experience with these is limited, one year and three long hives. But it was very positive. I did not have any mixing of brood into honey frames. That may be because I had my entrance at one end. The brood nest expanded away from the entrance, and the bees stored honey on the far side of the brood nest. In the fall, the nest contracted toward the entrance, with stores on one side.

This is what the honeycomb looked like.

newcomb2.jpg

I've already built a couple more of them for this season.

goingnorthweb.jpg
 

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They make very nice comb honey. I have had to wire my frames because I have heat issues in our hot environment. Most of mine have been moved to more or less permanent locations in the cooler mountain areas.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
They make very nice comb honey. I have had to wire my frames because I have heat issues in our hot environment. Most of mine have been moved to more or less permanent locations in the cooler mountain areas.
Paul - I know that i've watched many of the videos you've posted to youtube and you're a big fan of TBH, you've mentioned on the videos that you had long langs but no videos that i've seen of them. Would love to see some footage of how you have them set up and work them. Other then that, I still love the idea of using them as so many people have them and use them. I believe i'm going to build a few and put some splits into them and see how well they do. How many frames do you normally build them out for?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
>I've always heard the old line about bees go UP. However when they take up residence in a house attic, or a downed tree, going UP is not an option and they seem to do well even in those cases.

And horizontal hollow limbs and gas tanks of abandoned cars, and abandoned hot water heaters that are laying on their side...

>So my question is simply this - How do the bees winter in a Long Lang box? Do they make it through as well or better than in a standard Lang? You Top Bar Hive guys can chime in on this as well.

No difference if they start the winter at one end so they don't leave stores behind. Or if you get some warm days during winter for them to rearrange stores or move it may not even be that important that they be at one end...

I winter a few horizontal hives every winter with the no better or worse losses as any other kind of hive.
Michael - Same question for you as Paul M - How many frames do you build them out for?
 

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Who me? Must be another Paul McCarty. I don't have any top bar hives or Youtube videos. Heck, I still have dial-up. Now, as far as my long hives go - they originally started as 40 frame hives when I first started out - now they are sized to fit 3 eight frame deeps. Usually about 24-32 frames. I use the long box for brood and super with an 8 frame medium on my newest ones. I started with long hives and foundationless because I started with feral removals and didn't want to have to be building boxes all the time. Sort of a one shot hive - no supers or extra frills and cheaper to operate than standard langs with feral/removal bees. Now I use a mix of both normal and long styles.
 

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>Michael - Same question for you as Paul M - How many frames do you build them out for?

I assume you're asking how long they are? Mine are around 48". That usually runs about 33 bars (or in the case of a horizontal Langstroth, frames). I have several of both.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Michael B & Paul M, you guys have answered my questions perfectly. I've got a good understanding of how the bees will do in a long lang situation, as well as dimensions for it. Thanks to you both for helping me out on this one. Now it's time to make a few of them and see what my bees think of them in a couple months. Going to put splits into them with some Russian queens and see how they do. Thanks again gentlemen!
 

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First year Bee Keeper and first post here. I thought I would go with 8 frame boxes in the future to make things lighter and easier but now believe I'll build my next hive a long lang hive with deep frames for ease of use. Next step is do some measuring and building. Then I might move one of my hives into it and use the extra ten frame boxes to go with my other ten frame hive.
Y'all keep the information flowing.
 

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I wrote a little booklet on constructing and keeping long hives. If you search Amazon for my name, (Ray Aldridge) you'll find it.
 
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