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Whats your opinion on long hives?

  • stay away from them

    Votes: 3 33.3%
  • they're as good as langstroths

    Votes: 5 55.6%
  • they're better than langstroths

    Votes: 1 11.1%
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I am curious if anyone has made them work for wintering as far north as Saskatoon! You folks have serious winters! I think it would be harder to winter in one as the bees tend to move up not sideways when clustered. I am anxious to hear the voice of real northern experience on this one.
 

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I would like to see more input on "Long Hives" ! I have one, but with mixed emotions, although it over wintered well. I tryed a TBH and did not care for it, it took too much time.
 

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Crosscombing, expanding the brood area on and on, constant fussing with the thing. In short I did not like it! Interesting at first then they did not make it through the second winter, end of that experiment. I modified the TBH to a long Lang. all medium frames and it is working out much better.
 

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O.O. Poppleton, a commercial beekeeper in early 1900's Florida used a 35 rame long hive. He ran several hundred of them and said they were more efficient in labor and produced well. I have tried them and I can not see any benefit over the Langstroth. I can still handle 10 frame equipment by the box so I don't see the need to handle only one frame at a time as Mr. Poppleton did. In my conditions they overwintered OK but I have no idea how they would do farthr north.
 

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In a permanent yard there could be benefits if you are treatment free.

Benefits:
Cheaper to build
your not lifting boxes
you dont need to go to bottom of hive to check on brood
you can access any comb without moving boxes
can use any amount of frames by using a follower board
could have several nucleus in one long hive
could have a starter, finisher, and cell introduction chambers in one hive
can still stack honey supers on if needed
I could think of many more

Cons:
Lots

Final thoughts:
I should try one
 

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It appears to me that the brood area is designated by the entrance. Logic says if that is the case then you can only have one entrance. I will never go back to one entrance because I lost my bees the first year.
 

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I was in a dozen colonies yesterday with top entrances and the brood nest was in the bottom deep in all of them. That must be strange huh?
 

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Vance, I made comment for a standard long hive. There is no bottom deep in a long hive. If you put an entrance at the other end or multiple entrances I wonder what would happen through winter and subsequent years.
 

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They are going to keep the brood nest where every they feel like it. Most likely where they are first established and growing from there.
 

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We run all long hives now. They overwinter fine in central North Carolina, and it was a tough winter last year. Much better than lifting boxes. They do require more attention than Langs. You have to keep the brood nest open and remove honey frames so the hive does not get full. We have not tried adding supers but that might ease the work load. Overall, I prefer longs to Langs.
 

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If you put an entrance at the other end or multiple entrances I wonder what would happen through winter and subsequent years.
All our long hives have three entrance holes close together at each end of the hive. When we start a new hive from a package, all three are closed at the far end. We place the frames at the near end and gradually open the entrance holes as the hive grows.

When the hive exceeds half the size of the long box, we start opening holes at the far end. Foragers orient to the new entrance and use it just fine. In winter, we close off the far entrance and reduce the near entrance. We contract the hive down to the size of a single deep. So far we have not observed the brood nest moving to the far end. Has anyone else seen the brood nest move far down the box?

Actually, since we are constantly adding and removing frames, the bees don't really have a chance to move the brood nest. We are moving it just a little bit on a weekly or bi-weekly basis.
 

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I think with a combo you are right back to a Lang, it is just wider at the bottom.
 
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