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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I might be getting a hive with someone in my neighborhood. My wife doesn't want bees on our property so this is the only way. The neighbor has a wooded ares (not full sun and not full shade) that we could face the front of the hive SE, there are trees as windbreaks, and it's near a garden. Other things to note, the lake in our area is about 250ft west of this location. is that too far of a water source? It would be really nice if the lake could supply the water for the hive as that's one less thing to worry about. I might be doing most of the maintenance as well which is why I ask. She's providing the land and we'll probably split the cost of supplies.
 

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Speaking of location, it would be beneficial to you if you put yours in your profile. So much of beekeeping is local, so you will get better answers and from beekeepers in your area if you include that.
The water source is plenty close enough. Generally, facing a hive S to SE is good, but it would be better to know your location. You want them to get as much sun as early as possible without facing right into the prevailing winds. J
 

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Go for full sun, best you can. Summer is not going to be your problem, the damp winter will be. Sun is your friend.

My pond is a simiar distance from my hives, and they do OK, though I try to keep some water nearby as well. They often ignore the nearby water, preferring the pond.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
She didn't volunteer the center of the yard which was sunny. It's the play area for kids. Probably going to be limited there. They're willing to thin out some of the shrubbery. There's a giant blackberry hedge blocking it from the road so there's a barrier and blossoms
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
IMG_20200516_191818_577.jpg

Got everything on a simple frame, using RV leveling jacks since the ground was sloped and soft. Eventually we'll do pavers or something more rigid. I just had to get it off the ground. I went with the BetterBee top and bottom because it was only $3 more than wood at my supplier and figured the top feeder would be great. It was a pain initially setting it up because I kept bending the adapter trying to put it on the lid and syrup would stream down since the vacuum was broken. I thought I was going to ruin the colony the first day. It seems to be working fine now. It came with the robbing screen so I just put it on to play it safe. Went out there today, they're alive and well, the queen was spotted and she's doing her thing. I plan on weekly checks until I truly 'know what's happening' but otherwise we're off and running!

IMG_20200517_194623.jpg ,
 

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And you're off! Your hive stand sure looks sturdy, but I agree you need to get it off those jacks. One bump and the hive will fall off which is not something you want to happen. Trust me on this one. J
 

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I like to use 8" x 16" concrete cinder blocks. then the stand you have made up. I make my stands out of 4" x 4 ". This puts the bottom of the hive at 12". You do have to level up the blocks every few years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have those jack tips recessed into the posts so it is a bit more secure. But yes I do want them off the Jack's eventually. There's about an 8 inch drop from one side to the other. Or I could make cement footings with these allthread inserts for subtle adjustments if the ground softens. That was my original thought.
 
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