Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all! First post.

I have access to bees in an old Langstroth which I know haven't been handled in years. The hive consists of 2 deeps with one super in between, and something like 3 supers on top. The bottom board is no longer visible, it's buried in barn detritus; the bees have chewed a hole in the corner of one of the supers to get in and out.

Because the hive is under cover in the old hay barn, it's in fairly good shape, though I can't get the top off easily. I haven't tried to force anything because I don't have a veil, smoker, or tool as the parental units gave all that away years ago.

In researching, trying to figure out what to do, I came across the KTBH. This sounds just like something for ME to try, I don't know if I want to do anything with the bees except set them out for pollinators, and now have the makings of the hive according to Dan's Bees videos. I've added a few twists of my own, and am now wondering about proofing the wood.

I have used Linseed oil for my flutes for years, and one thing I can tell you is the Boiled stuff you get in the hardware store has additives to shorten the polymerization. I wasn't aware of this in the beginning, and wondered why I was always feeling weird after a flute was made. Now I use the stuff you get out of the Health food store, food grade.

I'm wondering what everyone's take on the use of linseed oil is, I pretty much used up my sad little store of wax making the top bars. Boiled? Food Grade? How does it hold up in weather? Will it proof 3/4 ply well enough to keep it together?

TIA,
Cap'n!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
Why not go get yourself some Tung Oil, its all natural and organic!! Specially if you have no wax to add with it and you have doubts! You can purchase the tung oil from Lowes home improvement center if you needed to know where to get it! Something to think about! Good Luck!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I don't know why I didn't do a search on the forum before I posted. I know the finish would get black and crappy looking after a while, I just have gallons of the stuff laying around. It looks like the best course (outside of beeswax dipping) is to just paint the thing. I'm going to look for some oil based paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
There is also Minwax Helmsman Clear Gloss Spar Urethane that works good also! Just in case you didnt want to paint them, i know i dont like painting! I built 3 hives a few weeks ago, each hive is 2 deep hive bodies, 3 medium supers with the top cover! I used Minwax Helmsman Clear Gloss Spar Urethane on all 3 hives and they turned out great! Buddy of mine built a warre hive and used the same stuff but in the satin, it looks good also! Good Luck!!

http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com/ProductDetails.aspx?SKU=11839
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I have used both tung oil and linseed oil. I have not had the finish turn black as others have said but I did mix the linseed oil with beeswax. The finish is holding up very well and we have some pretty harsh weather in Denver. I also hate having to paint things so I am now building my hives out of cedar.

As far as the spar varnish...I would worry about the breathability of the finish and that it might trap too much moisture. I guess if you are using plywood then the adhesives would already do that. I know that it will protect for many years as I have used it on many other woodworking projects and outdoor signs. If you are going to use a spar varnish I recommend the Man-o-war brand made by McCloskey as it is of higher quality and will last twice as long as the minwax brand.

Tung oil as works very well but let it dry out in the hot sun for a few days before hiving the bees otherwise it is a little sticky.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,406 Posts
I have no experience with woodworking. I build all my hives and equipment, but I'm a self taught man. In the past I've just used one coat of Killz, and one or two coats of cheap barn paint. My location has high humidity, and many of my boxes show wear (rot, decay) after just a few years (five or so). Mostly on the corners, or the bottom edges. Others on this site claim they can get 50-90 years out of their equipment. My goal is to get my equipment to last that long.

Suggestions? Tung oil, or linseed oil? Paint over that? Or just add more coats of primer?

I'm mainly looking for most cost effective. I usually take old pallets, cut them up, and turn them into equipment. It's free, so it works well for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hello!

Are you asking if to use Linseed Oil? I build flutes on occasion, and around 15 years ago I used boiled linseed oil. Turns out there are metals added to enhance the process of curing. This is great for paint, furniture polish, or the like, but lousy for wooden cookware, flutes, and I am assuming anything that comes in contact with bees for any length of time.

Because I had so much of it, I painted the wooden bed of a pickup I had built. The finish turned black, so much so someone commented it was a good idea I had, had to, "Paint it with used motor oil." Works good on furniture, not so good on stuff that stays out in the rain.

It will work to help prime the exterior of the wood. I mixed up some turpentine, about 1 part to 3 or 4 parts Boiled Linseed Oil, let it soak into the wood, did it again, and used about a quart.

Now about your pallets, don't make my mistake; read up on SHB.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,406 Posts
I was mainly talking about preserving wood in general. I've read that the use of Linseed Oil works wonders. Others claim it is worse than latex paint. Just trying to figure it all out.

Now about your pallets, don't make my mistake; read up on SHB.
What does small hive beetle have to do with pallets? I know about SHB, just not the connection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
And now hear my tale of woe, for my name is Lament...

I have never seen a pallet that has the wood I need unless I want to slap together a box to hold apples or firewood. Now if you have a jointer, and all the goodies in a wood shop, I would assume you will end up with a box with cracks, pits, holes, and so on. Just the kind of thing SHB love to hide in.

I have been jumping all weekend, the bees in the old rotten hive out in the barn absconded on Friday. I thought that was weird, so stitched up window screen and a t-shirt into a makeshift veil, socks over my gloves, and a sprayer of vinegar and water.

That hive is filthy with the little buggers. I kept reading about this "new threat," as you might notice, this thread is the first post I made in the forums in June. I haven't seen a hive, tree, or bee except at a distance in somebody's field, for 30 years. I just skipped over the SHB stuff. Now I have a full blown infestation.

I have a page set up, will update as I go along, but right now I'm in the barn under a hot tin roof, drenched with sweat and sour honey.

http://www.captainchicken.com/swarm/index.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,406 Posts
I can't say I have a jointer, or 'all the goodies of a wood shop.' I do have a hand planer, a table saw, circular saw, router, drill, and a number of hand tools. I don't keep all the boards from a pallet, and after a bit of working at it, my boxes have less pits, holes, and cracks than a purchased budget box.

They have worked well before, and I'm not too concerned about SHB. The key is being picky on what you choose to build out of. If you can cut a pallet into 18 boards, I might only use 4 or 5 of them. Thanks for the concerns though.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top