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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, New and upcoming beekeeper here. I am starting out with two hives, one with foundation, and the other foundation-less. My hive stand is perfectly level from side to side but leans back a little. I understand most will have their hives leaning a bit forward to drain out rain water,but I have screened bottom boards so I don't think I have to worry about this. On to my question : will it adversely effect the foundation-less hive if it leans to the rear but is perfectly level from side to side? I want to avoid "wonky" comb building in the frames.
 

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The critical leveling is side to side. Sounds like you have it covered.

Be sure to monitor the comb as they build it, and straighten if necessary. Sometimes you can get wacky comb even if the hive is perfectly level.
 

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Only thing I noticed is my girls just started towards the front when developing comb. Maybe that's because that's the side that got the most sun, maybe it's gravity.

I'm not experienced enough to know, but side to side is all that matters.
 

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It is the side to side leveling that is important. As for the water draining, the screen bottom won't help with that, because the water that drowns the bees is from condensation dripping from the inside top of the hive onto the bees. In the winter I actually put a one inch board under the front of the hive making it lean back so the water will drip off the inside back of the hive box and not on the bees. I do remove the board in the spring.
 

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The critical leveling is side to side. Sounds like you have it covered.

Be sure to monitor the comb as they build it, and straighten if necessary. Sometimes you can get wacky comb even if the hive is perfectly level.
There's probably an obvious answer to my question but I'll ask anyway. Why is the side to side leveling more important? Is it because it skews the comb production?
 

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Picture a plumb line hanging from the center of your top bar. That will be the exact direction they draw the comb down. They will build the comb from the center of the top bar "straight" down, at a right angle to the ground. If the box is leaning one way or the other from side to side, the comb will end up way off center at the bottom of the frame.

Front to back doesn't matter because the comb will still be centered in the frame.
 

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There's probably an obvious answer to my question but I'll ask anyway. Why is the side to side leveling more important? Is it because it skews the comb production?
Look at this pic... These bees are festooning and they will hang straight down. They don't care where the center of the bottom of the frame is... So if you do, then you need to make sure as they hang they will hit it when they get to the bottom.

 

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Look at this pic... These bees are festooning and they will hang straight down. They don't care where the center of the bottom of the frame is... So if you do, then you need to make sure as they hang they will hit it when they get to the bottom.

Got it. Thanks guys. I wasn't thinking about foundationless frames. Makes sense. Wish I had more time to read the forum-lots of good information/pics.
 

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Got it. Thanks guys. I wasn't thinking about foundationless frames. Makes sense. Wish I had more time to read the forum-lots of good information/pics.
Yeah, sorry, that was what the OP was asking about so I made some assumptions I shouldn't have made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Look at this pic... These bees are festooning and they will hang straight down. They don't care where the center of the bottom of the frame is... So if you do, then you need to make sure as they hang they will hit it when they get to the bottom.

That is an amazing photo showing the bees using gravity as a guide. Thanks for posting it Gilligan. A picture is definitely worth a thousand words.
 
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