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Discussion Starter #1
One of my new packages did not have any brood three weeks after I put it in the hive. Then recently I checked again and found spotty brood.

This leads me to believe I have a laying worker. Any suggestions as to how I can get these bees back on track?
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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Assuming that it is laying workers, and assuming you think it's worth the work, a frame of open brood and eggs every week for three weeks will get them raising a queen. A queen cell from another hive may straighten things out more quickly.

If you can find a queen, then it's not laying workers. If some of that brood is capped as worker brood, it's not laying workers. If it's spotty and all of it has domed caps on it, it's probably laying workers. If it's spotty, all of it has domed caps on it and every cell has dozens of eggs in them, then it is definitely laying workers.

http://bushfarms.com/beeslayingworkers.htm
http://bushfarms.com/beespanacea.htm
 

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I went into the problem hive again today. I still can't find the queen but I have never been good at doing that. However, I did see several worker bees with pollen on their legs which I understand usually means there is queen in the hive.

There is still very little brood but it does not look like drone brood. I also notice that all of the bees are staying on the four frames on one side of the box.

Will it help if I center those frames in the box?
 

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> I did see several worker bees with pollen on their legs which I understand usually means there is queen in the hive.

No. It does not mean that.

>There is still very little brood but it does not look like drone brood.

It's not so much the amount as the configuration. The number of bees there are to cover the brood and the amount of food available determine the amount. It should be all together and not scattered and the cappings should be pretty much flat (slightly convex) and not domed like kix cereal.

>I also notice that all of the bees are staying on the four frames on one side of the box.

That is the side that gets the most sun.
 

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>Will it help if I center those frames in the box?
If your hive was booming you might move them to the center so they can expand quicker. In your case I would leave them where they might be easier to defend with one side against the hive wall from internal pest like beetle and moths.

>I did see several worker bees with pollen on their legs which I understand usually means there is queen in the hive.
Bees collect pollen and nectar. That is not an accurate indicator.
 
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